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that they not only ceased from making expeditions against us, but even endured to see their own territory laid waste;Allusion is to the victory of Conon at the Eurymedon, 466 B.C. and we brought their power so low, for all that they had once sailed the sea with twelve hundred ships, that they launched no ship of war this side of PhaselisCf. Isoc. 7.80. There appears to have been a definite treaty setting bounds beyond which neither the sea nor land forces of Persia might go: see Isoc. 4.120 and Isoc. 12.59-61; also Dem. 19.273; Lyc. 1.73. This was the so-called Treaty of Callias: see Grote, Hist. v. pp. 192 ff. but remained inactive and waited on more favorable times rather than trust in the forces which they then possessed.
Conon (United Kingdom) (search for this): speech 4, section 118
that they not only ceased from making expeditions against us, but even endured to see their own territory laid waste;Allusion is to the victory of Conon at the Eurymedon, 466 B.C. and we brought their power so low, for all that they had once sailed the sea with twelve hundred ships, that they launched no ship of war this side of PhaselisCf. Isoc. 7.80. There appears to have been a definite treaty setting bounds beyond which neither the sea nor land forces of Persia might go: see Isoc. 4.120 and Isoc. 12.59-61; also Dem. 19.273; Lyc. 1.73. This was the so-called Treaty of Callias: see Grote, Hist. v. pp. 192 ff. but remained inactive and waited on more favorable times rather than trust in the forces which they then possessed.
that they not only ceased from making expeditions against us, but even endured to see their own territory laid waste;Allusion is to the victory of Conon at the Eurymedon, 466 B.C. and we brought their power so low, for all that they had once sailed the sea with twelve hundred ships, that they launched no ship of war this side of PhaselisCf. Isoc. 7.80. There appears to have been a definite treaty setting bounds beyond which neither the sea nor land forces of Persia might go: see Isoc. 4.120 and Isoc. 12.59-61; also Dem. 19.273; Lyc. 1.73. This was the so-called Treaty of Callias: see Grote, Hist. v. pp. 192 ff. but remained inactive and waited on more favorable times rather than trust in the forces which they then possessed.