hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Athens (Greece) 104 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 66 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 62 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 60 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 54 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 52 0 Browse Search
Messene (Greece) 46 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 40 0 Browse Search
Peloponnesus (Greece) 32 0 Browse Search
Asia 24 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Isocrates, To Philip (ed. George Norlin). Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 2 results.

ould not be convicted of falsehood. Alcibiades, however, after having caused these great calamities, was restored to his city, having won a great reputation, though not, indeed, enjoying the commendation of all.At length Alcibiades fell out with Athens' enemies, and began to intrigue in her favor; and so effectively did he work that his services were recognized at home and he was welcomed back to take again a leading part in the life of Athens, 408 B.C. There appears to have been no open oppoored to his city, having won a great reputation, though not, indeed, enjoying the commendation of all.At length Alcibiades fell out with Athens' enemies, and began to intrigue in her favor; and so effectively did he work that his services were recognized at home and he was welcomed back to take again a leading part in the life of Athens, 408 B.C. There appears to have been no open opposition to his return. The many who distrusted him probably thought him less dangerous at home than in exile.
For because they were persuaded by him to covet the sovereignty of the sea, they lost even their leadership on land; so that if one were to assert that they became subject to the dominion of their present illsFor this play of words— a)rxh/“beginning,” a)rxh/“dominion” — cf. Isoc. 4.119, Isoc. 3.28, Isoc. 8.101. when they attempted to seize the dominion of the sea, he could not be convicted of falsehood. Alcibiades, however, after having caused these great calamities, was restored to his city, having won a great reputation, though not, indeed, enjoying the commendation of all.At length Alcibiades fell out with Athens' enemies, and began to intrigue in her favor; and so effectively did he work that his services were recognized at home and he was welcomed back to take again a leading part in the life of Athens, 408 B.C. There appears to have been no open opposition to his return. The many who distrusted him probably thought him less dangerous at home tha