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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Pseudo-Xenophon (Old Oligarch), Constitution of the Athenians (ed. E. C. Marchant). Search the whole document.

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Berlin (Berlin, Germany) (search for this): chapter 3
uld they do this? First of all they have to hold more festivals than any other Greek city (and when these are going on it is even less possible for any of the city's affairs to be transacted), next they have to preside over private and public trials and investigations into the conduct of magistrates to a degree beyond that of all other men, and the council has to consider many issues involving war,Kirchhoff inferred chiefly from this passage that there was a war on: Abhandl. d. konigl. Akad. Berlin (1878), 8. Cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 34-5. revenues, law-making, local problems as they occur, also many issues on behalf of the allies, receipt of tribute, the care of dockyards and shrines. Is there accordingly any cause for surprise if with so much business they are unable to negotiate with all persons? But some say, “If you go to the council or assembly with money, you will transact your business.” I should agree with these people that many things are accomplished at Athens for money and still
Boeotia (Greece) (search for this): chapter 3
hey do deliberately; for if they preferred the upper class, they would prefer those who are contrary-minded to themselves. In no city is the superior element well disposed to the populace, but in each city it is the worst part which is well disposed to the populace. For like is well disposed to like. Accordingly the Athenians prefer those sympathetic to themselves. Whenever they have undertaken to prefer the upper class, it has not turned out well for them; within a short time the people in Boeotia were enslavedThis presumably happened sometime in the period 456-446: cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 35-6.; similarly when they preferred the Milesian upper class, within a short time that class had revolted and cut down the peoplePerhaps soon after 446: cf. JHS 82 (1962), 1 ff. Formerly dated to the late fifties.; similarly when they preferred the Spartans to the Messenians, within a short time the Spartans had overthrown the Messenians and were making war on the Athenians.An allusion to Athenian aid
Athens (Greece) (search for this): chapter 3
egotiate with the council or the assembly. This happens at Athens for no other reason than that owing to the quantity of busree with these people that many things are accomplished at Athens for money and still more would be accomplished if still monces, therefore, I deny that it is possible for affairs at Athens to be otherwise than as they now are, except insofar as itt interject that no one has been unjustly disfranchised at Athens. I say that there are some who have been unjustly disfranchised but very few indeed. To attack the democracy at Athens not a few are required. As this is so, there is no need to consyone think that many people were unjustly disfranchised at Athens, where the people are the ones who hold the offices? It iso say or do what is right that people are disfranchised at Athens. In view of these considerations one must not think that tsed at Athens. In view of these considerations one must not think that there is any danger at Athens from the disfranchised.
y do this? First of all they have to hold more festivals than any other Greek city (and when these are going on it is even less possible for any of the city's affairs to be transacted), next they have to preside over private and public trials and investigations into the conduct of magistrates to a degree beyond that of all other men, and the council has to consider many issues involving war,Kirchhoff inferred chiefly from this passage that there was a war on: Abhandl. d. konigl. Akad. Berlin (1878), 8. Cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 34-5. revenues, law-making, local problems as they occur, also many issues on behalf of the allies, receipt of tribute, the care of dockyards and shrines. Is there accordingly any cause for surprise if with so much business they are unable to negotiate with all persons? But some say, “If you go to the council or assembly with money, you will transact your business.” I should agree with these people that many things are accomplished at Athens for money and still more w
o consider many issues involving war,Kirchhoff inferred chiefly from this passage that there was a war on: Abhandl. d. konigl. Akad. Berlin (1878), 8. Cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 34-5. revenues, law-making, local problems as they occur, also many issues on behalf of the allies, receipt of tribute, the care of dockyards and shrines. Is they occur every four years.Literally in the fifth year, inclusively quinquennial like the Olympic games. The first irregular assessment occurred in 443. Cf. HSCP 71 (1966) 38. Well then, ought one to think that all these cases should not be dealt with? Let someone say what should not be dealt with there. If, on the other hand, one m, it has not turned out well for them; within a short time the people in Boeotia were enslavedThis presumably happened sometime in the period 456-446: cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 35-6.; similarly when they preferred the Milesian upper class, within a short time that class had revolted and cut down the peoplePerhaps soon after 446: cf. JHS
ace. For like is well disposed to like. Accordingly the Athenians prefer those sympathetic to themselves. Whenever they have undertaken to prefer the upper class, it has not turned out well for them; within a short time the people in Boeotia were enslavedThis presumably happened sometime in the period 456-446: cf. HSCP 71 (1966), 35-6.; similarly when they preferred the Milesian upper class, within a short time that class had revolted and cut down the peoplePerhaps soon after 446: cf. JHS 82 (1962), 1 ff. Formerly dated to the late fifties.; similarly when they preferred the Spartans to the Messenians, within a short time the Spartans had overthrown the Messenians and were making war on the Athenians.An allusion to Athenian aid to Sparta in the sixties on the occasion of the Messenian Revolt. Someone might interject that no one has been unjustly disfranchised at Athens. I say that there are some who have been unjustly disfranchised but very few indeed. To attack the democracy at Athens