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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Tegea or search for Tegea in all documents.

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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 52 (search)
o Greece the force of Greek mercenaries in Persia, about fifty thousand in number, who had descended to the coast. As for Aratus, I have related his exploits in my history of Sicyon.See Paus. 2.8.1. The inscription on the statue of Philopoemen at Tegea runs thus:—The valor and glory of this man are famed throughout Greece, who workedMany achievements by might and many by his counsels,Philopoemen, the Arcadian spearman, whom great renown attended,When he commanded the lances in war.Witness are tSee Paus. 2.8.1. The inscription on the statue of Philopoemen at Tegea runs thus:—The valor and glory of this man are famed throughout Greece, who workedMany achievements by might and many by his counsels,Philopoemen, the Arcadian spearman, whom great renown attended,When he commanded the lances in war.Witness are two trophies, won from the despotsOf Sparta; the swelling flood of slavery he stayed.Wherefore did Tegea set up in stone the great-hearted son of Craugis,Author of blameless freed
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 53 (search)
Such is the inscription at Tegea on Philopoemen. The images of Apollo, Lord of Streets, the Tegeans say they set up for the following reason. Apollo and Artemis, the of her when she came to their land. So when the divinities came to the land of Tegea, Scephrus, they say, the son of Tegeates, came to Apollo and had a private conv generally have different forms, and this is particularly true of genealogy. At Tegea the images of the Lord of Streets are four in number, one set up by each of theland among his sons, and after Hippothous, the son of Cercyon. There is also at Tegea a temple of Demeter and the Maid, whom they surname the Fruit-bringers, and haragainst the Lacedaemonians, and had the better of the engagement. I also saw in Tegea:—the house of Aleus, the tomb of Echemus, and the fight between Echemus and Hyllus carved in relief upon a slab. On the left of the road as you go from Tegea to Laconia there is an altar of Pan, and likewise one of Lycaean Zeus. The foundations
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Arcadia, chapter 54 (search)
The boundary between the territories of Lacedaemon and Tegea is the river Alpheius. Its water begins in Phylace, and not far from its source there flows down into it another water from springs that are not large, but many in number, whence the placeit shows in Ortygia, before Syracuse, that it is the Alpheius, and unites its water with Arethusa. The straight road from Tegea to Thyrea and to the villages its territory contains can show a notable sight in the tomb of Orestes, the son of Agamemno advancing ten stades you come to a sanctuary of Pan, by which is an oak, like the sanctuary sacred to Pan. The road from Tegea to Argos is very well suited for carriages, in fact a first-rate highway. On the road come first a temple and image of Asto be sacred to Pan. Crossing the peak of the mountain you are within the cultivated area, and reach the boundary between Tegea and Argos; it is near Hysiae in Argolis.These are the divisions of the Peloponnesus, the cities in the divisions, and the
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 7 (search)
racles at Thebes. The tripod has as its inscription:—Echembrotus of Arcadia dedicated this pleasant gift to HeraclesWhen he won a victory at the games of the Amphictyons,Singing for the Greeks tunes and lamentations.In this way the competition in singing to the flute was dropped. But they added a chariot-race, and Cleisthenes, the tyrant of Sicyon, was proclaimed victor in the chariot-race. At the eighth Pythian Festival they added a contest for harpists playing without singing; Agelaus of Tegea was crowned. At the twenty-third Pythian Festival they added a race in armour. For this Timaenetus of Phlius won the laurel, five Olympiads after Damaretus of Heraea was victorious. At the forty-eighth Pythian Festival they established a race for two-horse chariots, and the chariot won of Execestides the Phocian. At the fifth Festival after this they yoked foals to a chariot, and the chariot of Orphondas of Thebes came in first. The pancratium for boys, a race for a chariot drawn by two
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