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im I derived benefit at once from the very fact that I had invited him.” This tone, then, should be carefully preserved, in order that the mutual benefit we derive from one another may always go on increasing. So by way of helping towards this end I am now sending you some of the Pythagorean works and of the “Divisions,” and also, as we arranged at that time, a man of whom you and Archytas—if Archytas has come to your court—may be able to make use. His name is Helicon, he is a native of Cyzicus, and he is a pupil of EudoxusA famous astronomer. and exceedingly well versed in all his doctrine. Moreover, he has associated with one of the pupils of Isocrates and with Polyxenus,cf. Plat. L. 2.310c. Bryson “the Sophist” was a mathematician who claimed, it is said, to have “squared the circle” (cf. Aristot.An. Post. i. 9,Rhet. iii. 2). one of Bryson's companions; and, what is rare in these cases, he is not without charm of address nor is he of a churlish disposition; rat
Athens (Greece) (search for this): letter 13
hich we spent on the Leucadian ship belonged to us; this, then, was the sum I obtained, and on obtaining it I used it myself and sent off these purchases to you.Next, let me tell you what your position is in regard to money, both what you have at Athens and my own. I shall make use of your money, as I told you previously, just as I do that of all my other friends; I use as little as I possibly can, only just so much as I and the man I get it from agree to be necessary or right or fitting. Nowto my visit to your court, we must do as I said before: I must strive hard to keep the expense as low as possible, and if ever that is beyond my power, the charge must fall upon you.In the next place, as regards the spending of your own money at Athens, I have to tell you, first of all, that, contrary to what we supposed, you have not a single friend who will advance money in case I am required to spend something on furnishing a chorus or the like; and further, if you yourself have some urgent
Syracuse (Italy) (search for this): letter 13
Plato to Dionysius, Tyrant of Syracuse, wishes well-doing.Let this greeting not only commence my letter but serve at the same time as a token that it is from me.For the significance of the greeting “well-doing” see Plat. L. 3 ad init.; cf. Plat. L. 13.363b below. Once when you were feasting the Locrian youths and were seated at a distance from me, you got up and came over to me and in a friendly spirit made some remark which I thought excellent, as also did my neighbor at the table, who was one of the beautiful youths. And he then said—“No doubt, Dionysius, you find Plato of great benefit as regards philosophy!” And you replied—“Yes, and in regard to much else; since from the very moment of my inviting him I derived benefit at once from the very fact that I had invited him.” This tone, then, should be carefully preserved, in order that the mutual benefit we derive from one another may always go on increasing. So by way of helping towards this end I am now sending you s
Amorgos (Greece) (search for this): letter 13
discussed them, but I did try to discover whether he would take their occurrence hardly or calmly, and it seemed to me that if they occurred it would cause him no small vexation. As to all else Dion's attitude towards you seems to me to be reasonable both in word and deed. To Cratinus the brother of Timotheus, and my own companion, let us present a hoplite's corslet, one of the soft kind for foot-soldiers; and to the daughters of Cebes three tunics of seven cubits, not made of the costly Amorgos stuff but of the Sicilian linen. The name of Cebes you probably know; for he is mentioned in writing in the Socratic discourses as conversing with Socrates, in company with Simmias, in the discourse concerning the Soul,i.e. the Phaedo. he being an intimate and kindly friend of us all. Concerning the signCf. Plat. L. 13.360a below. which indicates which of my letters are seriously written and which not, I suppose that you remember it, but none the less bear it in mind and pay the utmost at
Rhegium (Italy) (search for this): letter 13
if you have any leisure at all, to take lessons from him in addition to your other studies in philosophy; but if not, get someone else thoroughly taught so that you may learn from him when you have leisure, and thereby make progress and gain glory,—that so the benefit you gain from me may still continue. So much, then, for this subject. As regards the things you wrote to me to send you, I have had the Apollo made and LeptinesA Pythagorean of this name is said to have murdered Callippus at Rhegium. is bringing it to you. It is by a young and good craftsman named Leochares.A sculptor of some eminence, pupil of Scopas. He had at his shop another piece which was, as I thought, very artistic; so I bought it with the intention of presenting it to your wife,Sophrosyne (“Prudence”), daughter of Dionysus the Elder and niece of Dion. because she tended me both in health and sickness in a manner which did credit both to you and to me. So will you give it to her, unless you prefer to do othe<
o your wife,Sophrosyne (“Prudence”), daughter of Dionysus the Elder and niece of Dion. because she tended me both in health and sickness in a manner which did credit hough at present I am the wealthiest of them, and it was I who, with the help of Dion and others, gave their mothers their portions. Now the eldest one is marrying Sher good for your reputation nor honorable.In the next place I shall speak about Dion. Other matters I cannot speak of as yet, until the letters from you arrive, as bade me to mention to him,This may be a reference to Dionysius's plan for giving Dion's wife Arete to a favorite of his own (cf. Plutarch,Dion 21). I neither mentioneDion 21). I neither mentioned nor discussed them, but I did try to discover whether he would take their occurrence hardly or calmly, and it seemed to me that if they occurred it would cause him no small vexation. As to all else Dion's attitude towards you seems to me to be reasonable both in word and deed. To Cratinus the brother of Timotheus, and my own co