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Plato to Dion of Syracuse wishes well-doing.It has been plain, I believe, all along that I took a keen interest in the operationsThis refers to Dion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and pDion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and perhaps later. that have been carried out, and that I was most anxious to see them finally completed. In this I was mainly prompted by my jealous regard for what is nobleThe reference is to Dion's plaDion's plans for the political reformation of Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous, and who act accordingly, should achieve the reputation they deserve. Now for the present (God willes certain persons (who these are of course you know)The persons meant are Plato's own pupils and Dion's political supporters. to surpass the rest of mankind as if they were less than children.For thiides; but we, as I said, know nothing, although we hear many reports from the people here. And, Dion, do you also bear in mind that you are thought by some to be unduly wanting in affability; so do
Lacedaemon (Greece) (search for this): letter 4
y this, seeing that you yourself also know it quite well; but I notice how even in the theaters the players are spurred on by the plaudits of the children—not to speak of their own friends—whenever a player believes them to be genuine and well-meaning in their encouragement.Cf. Isoc. Evag. 32.3. So do you also play your parts now; and if you have need of anything send us word.Affairs with us are in much the same state as when you were here. Send us word also about what you have already done or happen to be doing now, since we know nothing although we hear many reports.Even at this moment letters have come to Lacedaemon and Aegina from Theodotes and Heracleides; but we, as I said, know nothing, although we hear many reports from the people here. And, Dion, do you also bear in mind that you are thought by some to be unduly wanting in affability; so do not forget that successful action depends on pleasing people, whereas arrogance is next neighbor to isolation.Good-luck attend t
Aegina (Greece) (search for this): letter 4
y this, seeing that you yourself also know it quite well; but I notice how even in the theaters the players are spurred on by the plaudits of the children—not to speak of their own friends—whenever a player believes them to be genuine and well-meaning in their encouragement.Cf. Isoc. Evag. 32.3. So do you also play your parts now; and if you have need of anything send us word.Affairs with us are in much the same state as when you were here. Send us word also about what you have already done or happen to be doing now, since we know nothing although we hear many reports.Even at this moment letters have come to Lacedaemon and Aegina from Theodotes and Heracleides; but we, as I said, know nothing, although we hear many reports from the people here. And, Dion, do you also bear in mind that you are thought by some to be unduly wanting in affability; so do not forget that successful action depends on pleasing people, whereas arrogance is next neighbor to isolation.Good-luck attend t
Syracuse (Italy) (search for this): letter 4
Plato to Dion of Syracuse wishes well-doing.It has been plain, I believe, all along that I took a keen interest in the operationsThis refers to Dion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and perhaps later. that have been carried out, and that I was most anxious to see them finally completed. In this I was mainly prompted by my jealous regard for what is nobleThe reference is to Dion's plans for the political reformation of Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous, and who act accordingly, should achieve the reputation they deserve. Now for the present (God willing) affairs are going well; but it is in the future that the chief struggle lies. For while it might be thought that excellence in courage and speed and strength might belong to various other men, everyone would agree that surpassing excellence in truth, justice, generosity and the outward exhibition of all these virtues naturally belongs to those who profess to hold them in honor.Now the point
Sicily (Italy) (search for this): letter 4
Plato to Dion of Syracuse wishes well-doing.It has been plain, I believe, all along that I took a keen interest in the operationsThis refers to Dion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and perhaps later. that have been carried out, and that I was most anxious to see them finally completed. In this I was mainly prompted by my jealous regard for what is nobleThe reference is to Dion's plans for the political reformation of Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous,Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous, and who act accordingly, should achieve the reputation they deserve. Now for the present (God willing) affairs are going well; but it is in the future that the chief struggle lies. For while it might be thought that excellence in courage and speed and strength might belong to various other men, everyone would agree that surpassing excellence in truth, justice, generosity and the outward exhibition of all these virtues naturally belongs to those who profess to hold them in honor.Now the point
Plato to Dion of Syracuse wishes well-doing.It has been plain, I believe, all along that I took a keen interest in the operationsThis refers to Dion's military operations in Sicily in 357 B.C., and perhaps later. that have been carried out, and that I was most anxious to see them finally completed. In this I was mainly prompted by my jealous regard for what is nobleThe reference is to Dion's plans for the political reformation of Sicily; for I esteem it just that those who are truly virtuous, and who act accordingly, should achieve the reputation they deserve. Now for the present (God willing) affairs are going well; but it is in the future that the chief struggle lies. For while it might be thought that excellence in courage and speed and strength might belong to various other men, everyone would agree that surpassing excellence in truth, justice, generosity and the outward exhibition of all these virtues naturally belongs to those who profess to hold them in honor.Now the poin