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Dion 268 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Plato, Letters. Search the whole document.

Found 73 total hits in 9 results.

Locri (Italy) (search for this): letter 8
t age—as to this let everyone form his own notion; in any case this was the way in which salvation for the men of that generation came about. Seeing, then, that they proved themselves men of such a quality, it is surely right that they should be repaid with gratitude by all those whom they saved. But if in after times the tyrant's house has wrongly abused the bounty of the city, the penalty for this it has suffered in part,Alluding to the expulsion of Dionysius from Sicily; he retired to Locri in Italy. and in part it will have to pay. What, then, is the penalty rightly to be exacted from them under existing circumstances? If you were able to get quit of them easily, without serious dangers and trouble, or if they were able to regain the empire without difficulty, then, in either case, it would not have been possible for me so much as to offer the advice which I am now about to utter; but as it is, both of you ought to bear in mind and remember how many times each party has hop
Messene (Greece) (search for this): letter 8
d I am speaking somewhat like an arbitrator, and addressing to the two parties, the former despot and his subjects, as though each were a single person, the counsel I gave of old. And now also my word of advice to every despot would be that he should shun the despot's title and his task, and change his despotism for kingship. That this is possible has been actually proved by that wise and good man Lycurguscf. Plat. L. 4.320d.; for when he saw that the family of his kinsmen in Argos and in Messene had in both cases destroyed both themselves and their city by advancing from kingship to despotic power, he was alarmed about his own city as well as his own family, and as a remedy he introduced the authority of the Elders and of the Ephors to serve as a bond of safety for the kingly powercf. Plat. Laws 692a.; and because of this they have already been kept safe and glorious all these generations since Law became with them supreme king over men instead of men being despots over the laws.A
Argos (Greece) (search for this): letter 8
ce. For indeed I am speaking somewhat like an arbitrator, and addressing to the two parties, the former despot and his subjects, as though each were a single person, the counsel I gave of old. And now also my word of advice to every despot would be that he should shun the despot's title and his task, and change his despotism for kingship. That this is possible has been actually proved by that wise and good man Lycurguscf. Plat. L. 4.320d.; for when he saw that the family of his kinsmen in Argos and in Messene had in both cases destroyed both themselves and their city by advancing from kingship to despotic power, he was alarmed about his own city as well as his own family, and as a remedy he introduced the authority of the Elders and of the Ephors to serve as a bond of safety for the kingly powercf. Plat. Laws 692a.; and because of this they have already been kept safe and glorious all these generations since Law became with them supreme king over men instead of men being despots o
Sicily (Italy) (search for this): letter 8
w that the tyranny is broken down over the whole of Sicily all your fighting rages round this one subject of de such consequences clearly in the recent events in Sicily itself, where the one faction is trying to inflict in the hour of their greatest distress, when Greek Sicily was in the utmost danger of being entirely overrun , appointing them dictators for the safeguarding of Sicily, with the title, as men say, of “tyrants.” But wherdly a trace of the Greek tongue will remain in all Sicily, since it will have been transformed into a provincen you have accepted laws of this kind, inasmuch as Sicily is beset with dangers, and you are neither completes now occurring in order to secure the salvation of Sicily provided that they receive honors both in the presesuch men as they may choose, whether they come from Sicily or from abroad or both, and in such numbers as may been realized, I should have resettled the rest of Sicily by depriving the barbarians of the land they now ho
Italy (Italy) (search for this): letter 8
gratitude by all those whom they saved. But if in after times the tyrant's house has wrongly abused the bounty of the city, the penalty for this it has suffered in part,Alluding to the expulsion of Dionysius from Sicily; he retired to Locri in Italy. and in part it will have to pay. What, then, is the penalty rightly to be exacted from them under existing circumstances? If you were able to get quit of them easily, without serious dangers and trouble, or if they were able to regain the empiequences—likely as they are though lamentable—come to pass, hardly a trace of the Greek tongue will remain in all Sicily, since it will have been transformed into a province or dependency of Phoenicians or Opicians.Probably some tribes of central Italy, Samnites or Campanians. Against this all the Greeks must with all zeal provide a remedy. If, therefore, any man knows of a remedy that is truer and better than that which I am now about to propose, and puts it openly before us, he shall have th
Greece (Greece) (search for this): letter 8
ntable—come to pass, hardly a trace of the Greek tongue will remain in all Sicily, since it will have been transformed into a province or dependency of Phoenicians or Opicians.Probably some tribes of central Italy, Samnites or Campanians. Against this all the Greeks must with all zeal provide a remedy. If, therefore, any man knows of a remedy that is truer and better than that which I am now about to propose, and puts it openly before us, he shall have the best right to the title “Friend of Greece.” The remedy, however, which commends itself to me I shall now endeavor to explain, using the utmost freedom of speech and a tone of impartial justice. For indeed I am speaking somewhat like an arbitrator, and addressing to the two parties, the former despot and his subjects, as though each were a single person, the counsel I gave of old. And now also my word of advice to every despot would be that he should shun the despot's title and his task, and change his despotism for kingship. That<
Agrigentum (Italy) (search for this): letter 8
heir forefathers' disease, which the men of that time suffered because of their excessive anarchy, through indulging an unmeasured love of freedom. For the Siceliots of the age before Dionysius and Hipparinus began to rule were living blissfully, as they supposed, being in luxury and ruling also over their rulers; and they even stoned to death the ten generals who preceded Dionysius, without any legal trial,Plato is here in error, apparently: the stoning took place at an earlier date at Agrigentum. to show that they were no slaves of any rightful master, nor of any law, but were in all ways altogether free. Hence it was that the rule of the despots befell them. For as regards both slavery and freedom, when either is in excess it is wholly evil, but when in moderation wholly good; and moderate slavery consists in being the slave of God, immoderate, in being the slave of men; and men of sound sense have Law for their God,Law is divine as “the dispensation of Reason” (NO/MOSbeing de
Plato to the relatives and companions of Dion wishes well-doing.The policy which would best serve to secure your real “welldoer of impious deedsAlluding to Callippus, the murderer of Dion.; for such deeds are irremediable and none could ever washre.Since these things are naturally ordained thus, I exhort Dion's friends to declare what I am advising to all the Syracusans, as being the joint advice both of Dion and myself; and I will be the interpreter of what he would have said to you now, then,” someone might say, “what message does the advice of Dion declare to us concerning the present situation?” It is thiionysius the Elder: cf. Plat. L. 8.357c. This Hipparinus, Dion's nephew, was now assisting Dion's party in their attacks oDion's party in their attacks on Callippus from their base at Leontini. in return for his present assistance and for his pious disposition; for he, though your aid, had not Furies in the guise of guestsAlluding to Dion's murderers, Callippus and Philostratus; cf. Plat. L. 7.3
to advise such a policy or attempt to describe it is much like saying a prayer. “Prayer” in the sense of a “pious wish” unlikely to be fulfilled, or a “last resort.” Be it so, then, that this is nothing but a prayer (and in truth every man ought always to begin his speaking and his thinking with the gods); yet may it attain fulfilment in indicating some such counsel as this:—Now and almost ever since the warThe struggle against the Carthaginians, which had lasted, with hardly a break, since 409 B.C. began both you and your enemies have been ruled continuously by that one family which your fathers set on the throne in the hour of their greatest distress, when Greek Sicily was in the utmost danger of being entirely overrun by the Carthaginians and barbarized. On that occasion they chose Dionysius because of his youth and warlike prowess to take charge of the military operations for which he was suited, with Hipparinus, who was older, as his fellow-counsellor, appointing them d