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Shakespeare (Canada) (search for this): book 1, section 343a
philosophers used this and similar terms (1) of stupidity, (2) as a type of the minor ills of the flesh. Horace, Satire i. 4. 8, ii. 2. 76, Epictet. i. 6. 30A)LL' AI( MU/CAI MOU R(E/OUSI. and doesn't wipe your face clean, though you need it badly, if she can't get you to knowLiterally, “if you don't know for her.” For the ethical dative cf. Shakespeare Taming of the Shrew, I. ii. 8 “Knock me here soundly.” Not to know the shepherd from the sheep seems to be proverbial. “Shepherd of the people,” like “survival of the fittest,” may be used to prove anything in ethics and politics. Cf. Newman, Introduction Aristotle Politics p. 431, Xenophon Memorabilia
Horace (Illinois, United States) (search for this): book 1, section 343a
of asking such a question?” “Because,” he said, “she lets her little 'snotty' run about drivellingKORUZW=NTAL. and S., also s.v. KO/UZA. Lucian, Lexiphanes 18, treats the expression as an affectation, but elsewhere employs it. The philosophers used this and similar terms (1) of stupidity, (2) as a type of the minor ills of the flesh. Horace, Satire i. 4. 8, ii. 2. 76, Epictet. i. 6. 30A)LL' AI( MU/CAI MOU R(E/OUSI. and doesn't wipe your face clean, though you need it badly, if she can't get you to knowLiterally, “if you don't know for her.” For the ethical dative cf. Shakespeare Taming of the Shrew, I. ii. 8 “Knock me here soundly.” Not to know the shepherd from
Phil (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): book 1, section 343a
badly, if she can't get you to knowLiterally, “if you don't know for her.” For the ethical dative cf. Shakespeare Taming of the Shrew, I. ii. 8 “Knock me here soundly.” Not to know the shepherd from the sheep seems to be proverbial. “Shepherd of the people,” like “survival of the fittest,” may be used to prove anything in ethics and politics. Cf. Newman, Introduction Aristotle Politics p. 431, Xenophon Memorabilia iii. 2. 1, Suetonius Vit. Tib. 32, and my note in Class. Phil. vol. i. p. 298. the difference between the shepherd and the sheep.” “And what, pray, makes you think that?” said I. “Because you think that the shepherds
Lucian (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): book 1, section 343a
Republic is clearly indicated, but we are not yet ready to debate it seriously. said, “Tell me, Socrates, have you got a nurse?” “What do you mean?” said I. “Why didn't you answer me instead of asking such a question?” “Because,” he said, “she lets her little 'snotty' run about drivellingKORUZW=NTAL. and S., also s.v. KO/UZA. Lucian, Lexiphanes 18, treats the expression as an affectation, but elsewhere employs it. The philosophers used this and similar terms (1) of stupidity, (2) as a type of the minor ills of the flesh. Horace, Satire i. 4. 8, ii. 2. 76, Epictet. i. 6. 30A)LL' AI( MU/CAI MOU R(E/OUSI. and doesn't wipe your face clean, though you need