hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Plato (Colombia) 66 0 Browse Search
Meno (Oklahoma, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Iliad (Montana, United States) 40 0 Browse Search
Meno (New York, United States) 38 0 Browse Search
Phil (Kentucky, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Lucian (Arkansas, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Phil (North Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Ruskin (Canada) 18 0 Browse Search
Phil (Nevada, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Plato, Republic. Search the whole document.

Found 10 total hits in 6 results.

Cf. my note in Class. Phil. 1917, vol. xii. p. 436. It does not refer to Thrasymachus facetiously as Adam fancies, but is an honorific expression borrowed from the Pythagoreans. in the beginning of the elegy which the admirerPossibly Critias. of Glaucon wrote when you distinguished yourselves in the battle of MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus were uncles of Plato, but Zeller decides for the usual view that they wre brothers. Cf. Ph. d. Gr. ii. 1, 4th ed. 1889, p.
Phil (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): book 2, section 368a
pleased by their words on this occasion, and said: It was excellently spoken of you, sons of the man we know, Cf. my note in Class. Phil. 1917, vol. xii. p. 436. It does not refer to Thrasymachus facetiously as Adam fancies, but is an honorific expression borrowed from the Pythagoreans. in the beginning of the elegy which the admirerPossibly Critias. of Glaucon wrote when you distinguished yourselves in the battle of MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus we
e in Class. Phil. 1917, vol. xii. p. 436. It does not refer to Thrasymachus facetiously as Adam fancies, but is an honorific expression borrowed from the Pythagoreans. in the beginning of the elegy which the admirerPossibly Critias. of Glaucon wrote when you distinguished yourselves in the battle of MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus were uncles of Plato, but Zeller decides for the usual view that they wre brothers. Cf. Ph. d. Gr. ii. 1, 4th ed. 1889, p. 392, and Abhandl. d.
MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus were uncles of Plato, but Zeller decides for the usual view that they wre brothers. Cf. Ph. d. Gr. ii. 1, 4th ed. 1889, p. 392, and Abhandl. d. Berl. Akad., 1873, Hist.-Phil Kl. pp. 86 ff. whose race from a glorious sire is god-like.' This, my friends, I think, was well said. For there must indeed be a touch of the god-like in your disposition if you are not convinced that injustice is preferable to justice though you can plead its case in such fashion.
MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus were uncles of Plato, but Zeller decides for the usual view that they wre brothers. Cf. Ph. d. Gr. ii. 1, 4th ed. 1889, p. 392, and Abhandl. d. Berl. Akad., 1873, Hist.-Phil Kl. pp. 86 ff. whose race from a glorious sire is god-like.' This, my friends, I think, was well said. For there must indeed be a touch of the god-like in your disposition if you are not convinced that injustice is preferable to justice though you can plead its case in such fashion.
pleased by their words on this occasion, and said: It was excellently spoken of you, sons of the man we know, Cf. my note in Class. Phil. 1917, vol. xii. p. 436. It does not refer to Thrasymachus facetiously as Adam fancies, but is an honorific expression borrowed from the Pythagoreans. in the beginning of the elegy which the admirerPossibly Critias. of Glaucon wrote when you distinguished yourselves in the battle of MegaraProbably the battle of 409 B.C., reported in Diodor. Sic. xiii. 65. Cf. Introduction p. viii.—'Sons of Ariston,The implied pun on the name is made explicit in 580 C-D. Some have held that Glaucon and Adeimantus we