hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Plato (Colombia) 66 0 Browse Search
Meno (Oklahoma, United States) 56 0 Browse Search
Iliad (Montana, United States) 40 0 Browse Search
Meno (New York, United States) 38 0 Browse Search
Phil (Kentucky, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Lucian (Arkansas, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Phil (North Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Ruskin (Canada) 18 0 Browse Search
Phil (Nevada, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Plato, Republic. Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 2 results.

Phil (Nevada, United States) (search for this): book 3, section 389a
must accept it, much less if gods.” “Much indeed,” he replied. “Then we must not accept from Homer such sayings as these either about the gods: Quenchless then was the laughterIt is a commonplace that the primitive sense of humor of the Homeric gods laughs at the personal deformity of Hephaestus, but they really laugh at his officiousness and the contrast he presents to Hebe. Cf. my note in Class. Phil. xxii. (1927) pp. 222-223. that rose from the blessed immortals When they beheld Hephaestus officiously puffing and panting. Hom. Il. 1.599-600—we must not accept it on your view.” “If i
must accept it, much less if gods.” “Much indeed,” he replied. “Then we must not accept from Homer such sayings as these either about the gods: Quenchless then was the laughterIt is a commonplace that the primitive sense of humor of the Homeric gods laughs at the personal deformity of Hephaestus, but they really laugh at his officiousness and the contrast he presents to Hebe. Cf. my note in Class. Phil. xxii. (1927) pp. 222-223. that rose from the blessed immortals When they beheld Hephaestus officiously puffing and panting. Hom. Il. 1.599-600—we must not accept it on your view.” “If i