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Plat (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): book 4, section 443d
Gorgias 504. within himself,Cf. 621 C and on 352 A. and having harmonizedThe harmony of the three parts of the soul is compared to that of the three fundamental notes or strings in the octave, including any intervening tones, and so by implication any faculties of the soul overlooked in the preceding classification. Cf. Plutarch, Plat. Quest. 9. Proclus, p. 230 Kroll.W(/SPER introduces the images, the exact application of which is pointed by A)TEXNW=S. Cf. on 343 C. The scholiast tries to make two octaves (DI\S DIA\ PASW=N) of it. The technical musical details have at the most an antiquarian interest, and in no way affect the thought, which is that of Shakespeare's “For government,
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): book 4, section 443d
43 C. The scholiast tries to make two octaves (DI\S DIA\ PASW=N) of it. The technical musical details have at the most an antiquarian interest, and in no way affect the thought, which is that of Shakespeare's “For government, though high and low and lower,/ Put into parts, doth keep one in concent,/ Congreeing in a full and natural close/ Like music.” (Henry V. I. ii. 179) Cf. Cicero, De rep. ii. 42, and Milton (Reason of Church Government), “Discipline . . . which with her musical chords preserves and holds all the parts thereof together.” these three principles, the notes or intervals of three terms quite literally the lowest, the highest, and the
Kroll (Oregon, United States) (search for this): book 4, section 443d
504. within himself,Cf. 621 C and on 352 A. and having harmonizedThe harmony of the three parts of the soul is compared to that of the three fundamental notes or strings in the octave, including any intervening tones, and so by implication any faculties of the soul overlooked in the preceding classification. Cf. Plutarch, Plat. Quest. 9. Proclus, p. 230 Kroll.W(/SPER introduces the images, the exact application of which is pointed by A)TEXNW=S. Cf. on 343 C. The scholiast tries to make two octaves (DI\S DIA\ PASW=N) of it. The technical musical details have at the most an antiquarian interest, and in no way affect the thought, which is that of Shakespeare's “For government, though high and low and