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Phil (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): book 5, section 450b
ore.” The expression was proverbial and was explained by an obscure anecdote. Cf. Leutsch, Paroemiographi, ii. pp. 91, 727, and i. p. 464, and commentators on Herodotus iii. 102. and not to listen to discussions?” “Yes,” I said, “in measure.” “Nay, Socrates,” said Glaucon, “the measurePlato often anticipates and repels the charge of tedious length (see Politicus 286 C, Philebus 28 D, 36 D). Here the thought takes a different turn (as 504 C). The DE/ GE implies a slight rebuke (Cf. Class. Phil. xiv. pp. 165-174). of listening to such discussions is the whole of life for reasonable men. So don't consider us, and do not you yourself
Meno (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): book 5, section 450b
as I then set it forth! You don't realize what a swarmFor the metaphor cf. Euripides Bacchae 710 and SMH=NOS, Republic 574 D, Cratylus 401 C, Meno 72 A. of arguments you are stirring upCf. Philebus 36 D, Theaetetus 184 A, Cratylus 411 A. by this demand, which I foresaw and evaded to save us no end of trouble.” “Well,” said Thrasymachus,Thrasymachus speaks here for the last time. He is mentioned in 357 A, 358 B-C, 498 C, 545 B, 590 D.“do you suppose this company has come here to prospect for goldLit. “to smelt ore.” The expression was proverbial and was explained by an obscure anecdote. Cf. Leutsch, Paroemiographi, ii. pp.