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that it is ever enamored of the kind of knowledge which reveals to them something of that essence which is eternal, and is not wandering between the two poles of generation and decay.Lit. “is not made to wander by generation and decay.” Cf. Crat. 411 C, Phaedo 95 E, whence Aristotle took his title. See Class. Phil. xvii. (1922) pp. 334-352.” “Let us take that as agreed.” “And, further,” said I, “that their desire is for the whole of it and that they do not willingly renounce a small or a great, a more precious or a less honored, part of it. That was the point of our former illustrationSupra 474 C-D. drawn from lovers and men covetous of honor.” “You are right,” he said. “Consider, then, next whethe
Phil (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): book 6, section 485b
that it is ever enamored of the kind of knowledge which reveals to them something of that essence which is eternal, and is not wandering between the two poles of generation and decay.Lit. “is not made to wander by generation and decay.” Cf. Crat. 411 C, Phaedo 95 E, whence Aristotle took his title. See Class. Phil. xvii. (1922) pp. 334-352.” “Let us take that as agreed.” “And, further,” said I, “that their desire is for the whole of it and that they do not willingly renounce a small or a great, a more precious or a less honored, part of it. That was the point of our former illustrationSupra 474 C-D. drawn from lovers and men covetous of honor.” “You are right,” he said. “Consider, then, next whethe