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s and similar checks on pretenders to knowledge Cf. Laches 185 E, 186 A and C, Alc. I. 109 D and Gorg. 514 B-C. or any time when he studied it. And what is more, they affirm that it cannot be taught at all,Plato of course believed that virtue or the political art can be taught in a reformed state, but practically was not taught at Athens. Cf. Unity of Plato's Thought, p. 14, on 518 D, What Plato Said, pp. 70 and 511, Newman, Introd. Aristot.Pol. p. 397, Thompson on Meno 70 A. but they are ready to make mincemeat of anyoneA hint of the fate of Socrates. Cf. 517 A, 494 E and Euthyphro 3 E. who says that
Milton (Missouri, United States) (search for this): book 6, section 488b
but who is slightly deafCf. Aristoph.Knights 42-44. and of similarly impaired vision, and whose knowledge of navigation is on a par withCf. 390 C, 426 D, 498 B, Theaetet. 167 B, and Milton's “unknown and like esteemed,” Comus 630. his sight and hearing. Conceive the sailors to be wrangling with one another for control of the helm, each claiming that it is his right to steer though he has never learned the art and cannot point out his teacherFor this and similar checks on pretenders to knowledge Cf. Laches 185 E, 186 A and C, Alc. I. 109 D and Gorg. 514 B-C. or any time when he studied it. And what is more, they affirm that it cannot be taught at all,Plato of course belie
Comus (Maryland, United States) (search for this): book 6, section 488b
but who is slightly deafCf. Aristoph.Knights 42-44. and of similarly impaired vision, and whose knowledge of navigation is on a par withCf. 390 C, 426 D, 498 B, Theaetet. 167 B, and Milton's “unknown and like esteemed,” Comus 630. his sight and hearing. Conceive the sailors to be wrangling with one another for control of the helm, each claiming that it is his right to steer though he has never learned the art and cannot point out his teacherFor this and similar checks on pretenders to knowledge Cf. Laches 185 E, 186 A and C, Alc. I. 109 D and Gorg. 514 B-C. or any time when he studied it. And what is more, they affirm that it cannot be taught at all,Plato of course beli
Meno (New York, United States) (search for this): book 6, section 488b
on pretenders to knowledge Cf. Laches 185 E, 186 A and C, Alc. I. 109 D and Gorg. 514 B-C. or any time when he studied it. And what is more, they affirm that it cannot be taught at all,Plato of course believed that virtue or the political art can be taught in a reformed state, but practically was not taught at Athens. Cf. Unity of Plato's Thought, p. 14, on 518 D, What Plato Said, pp. 70 and 511, Newman, Introd. Aristot.Pol. p. 397, Thompson on Meno 70 A. but they are ready to make mincemeat of anyoneA hint of the fate of Socrates. Cf. 517 A, 494 E and Euthyphro 3 E. who says that it can be taught,