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Olympia (Greece) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
5,000 Rhegini, and Strabo might have so written, for the Greek symbol for 5,000 (,e), might have fallen out of the text. clashed with one hundred and thirty thousand Crotoniates and gained the victory—an occurrence which gave rise, it is said, to the proverb we use with incredulous people, "Truer than the result at Sagra." And some have gone on to add the fable that the news of the result was reported on the same dayCicero De Natura Deorum 2.2 refers to this tradition. to the people at the Olympia when the games were in progress, and that the speed with which the news had come was afterwards verified. This misfortune of the Crotoniates is said to be the reason why their city did not endure much longer, so great was the multitude of men who fell in the battle. After the Sagra comes a city founded by the Achaeans, Caulonia, formerly called Aulonia, because of the glen"Aulon." which lies in front of it. It is deserted, however, for those who held it were driven out by the barbarians
Leucosia (Cyprus) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
After the mouth of the Silaris one comes to Leucania, and to the temple of the Argoan Hera, built by Jason, and near by, within fifty stadia, to Poseidonia. Thence, sailing out past the gulf, one comes to Leucosia,Now Licosa. an island, from which it is only a short voyage across to the continent. The island is named after one of the Sirens, who was cast ashore here after the Sirens had flung themselves, as the myth has it, into the depths of the sea. In front of the island lies that promontceived the sea that was on either side, both hereAt the Strait. and between the other islands in that region.Cp. 1. 3. 10 and the footnote. And, in fact, Prochyte and the Pithecussae are fragments broken off from the continent, as also Capreae, Leucosia, the Sirenes, and the Oenotrides. Again, there are islands which have arisen from the high seas, a thing that even now happens in many places; for it is more plausible that the islands in the high seas were heaved up from the deeps, whereas it
Messana (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
their home. But according to Antiochus, the Zanclaeans sent for the Chalcidians and appointed Antimnestus their founder-in-chief.Zancle was the original name of Messana (now Messina) in Sicily. It was colonized and named Messana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the PeloponnMessina) in Sicily. It was colonized and named Messana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the Peloponnesian Messenians who had been defeated by the men of the opposing faction. These men were unwilling to be punished by the Lacedaemonians for the violation of the maidensCp. 6. 3. 3. and 8. 4. 9. which took place at Limnae, though they were themselves guilty of the outrage done to the maidens, who had been sent there for a religiouMessana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the Peloponnesian Messenians who had been defeated by the men of the opposing faction. These men were unwilling to be punished by the Lacedaemonians for the violation of the maidensCp. 6. 3. 3. and 8. 4. 9. which took place at Limnae, though they were themselves guilty of the outrage done to the maidens, who had been sent there for a religious rite and had also killed those who came to their aid.Cp. Paus. 4.4.1 So the refugees, after withdrawing to Macistus, sent a deputation to the oracle of the god to find fault with Apollo and Artemis if such was to be their fate in return for their trying to avenge those gods, and also to enquire how they, now utterly ruined, migh
Aulon (Albania) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
result was reported on the same dayCicero De Natura Deorum 2.2 refers to this tradition. to the people at the Olympia when the games were in progress, and that the speed with which the news had come was afterwards verified. This misfortune of the Crotoniates is said to be the reason why their city did not endure much longer, so great was the multitude of men who fell in the battle. After the Sagra comes a city founded by the Achaeans, Caulonia, formerly called Aulonia, because of the glen"Aulon." which lies in front of it. It is deserted, however, for those who held it were driven out by the barbarians to Sicily and founded the Caulonia there. After this city comes Scylletium, a colony of the Athenians who were with Menestheus (and now called Scylacium).Cp. Vergil Aen. 3.552 Though the Crotoniates held it, Dionysius included it within the boundaries of the Locri. The Scylletic Gulf, which, with the Hipponiate Gulf forms the aforementioned isthmus,6. 1. 4. is named after the cit
Tamassos (Cyprus) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
note on Iliad 1.185) quotes "the geographer" (i.e., Strabo; see note 1, p. 320) as making the saying apply to "those who are unduly wroth, or very severe when they should not be." that they are "beset by the hero of Temesa." But when the Epizephyrian Locrians captured the city, Euthymus, the pugilist, so the story goes, entered the lists against Polites, defeated him in the fight and forced him to release the natives from the tribute. People say that Homer has in mind this Temesa, not the Tamassus in Cyprus (the name is spelled both ways), when he says "to Temesa, in quest of copper."Hom. Od. 1.184 And in fact copper mines are to be seen in the neighborhood, although now they have been abandoned. Near Temesa is Terina, which Hannibal destroyed, because he was unable to guard it, at the time when he had taken refuge in Brettium itself. Then comes Consentia, the metropolis of the Brettii; and a little above this city is Pandosia, a strong fortress, near which Alexander the Molossia
Laconia (Greece) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
tly. at Delphi. And writers produce as a sign of its having been founded by the Pylians the sacrifice to the shades of the sons of Neleus.Neleus had twelve sons, including Nestor. All but Nestor were slain by Heracles. However, the city was wiped out by the Samnitae. According to Antiochus: Certain of the Achaeans were sent for by the Achaeans in Sybaris and resettled the place, then forsaken, but they were summoned only because of a hatred which the Achaeans who had been banished from Laconia had for the Tarantini, in order that the neighboring Tarantini might not pounce upon the place; there were two cities, but since, of the two, Metapontium was nearerThe other, of course, was Siris. to Taras,The old name of Tarentum. the newcomers were persuaded by the Sybarites to take Metapontium and hold it, for, if they held this, they would also hold the territory of Siris, whereas, if they turned to the territory of Siris, they would add Metapontium to the territory of the Tarantini, w
Acheron (New Zealand) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
city is Pandosia, a strong fortress, near which Alexander the MolossianCp. 6. 3. 4 and footnote. was killed. He, too, was deceived by the oracleThe oracle, quoted by Casaubon from some source unknown to subsequent editors was:*ai)aki/dh, profu/laco molei=n *a)xerou/sion u(/dwr*pandosi/hn d' o(/qi toi qa/natos peprwme/nos e)sti/Source unknown. "Son of Aeacus, beware to go to the Acherusian water and Pandosia, where it is fated you will die." at Dodona, which bade him be on his guard against Acheron and Pandosia; for places which bore these names were pointed out to him in Thesprotia, but he came to his end here in Brettium. Now the fortress has three summits, and the River Acheron flows past it. And there was another oracle that helped to deceive him: Three-hilled Pandosia, much people shalt thou kill one day; for he thought that the oracle clearly meant the destruction of the enemy, not of his own people. It is said that Pandosia was once the capital of the Oenotrian Kings. Af
mention in the Odyssey.Hom. Od. 10.2ff They are seven in number and are all within view both from Sicily and from the continent near Medma. But I shall tell about them when I discuss Sicily. After the Metaurus River comes a second Metaurus.Strabo's "Metaurus" and "second Metaurus" are confusing. Kramer, Meineke, and others wish to emend the text so as to make the "second" river refer to Crataeis or some other river. But we should have expected Strabo to mention first the Medma (now the Mesima), which was much closer to Medma than the Metaurus (now the Marro), and to which he does not refer at all. Possibly he thought both rivers were called Metaurus (cp. Müller, Ind. Var. Lectionis, p. 975), in which case "the second Metaurus" is the Metaurus proper. The present translator, however, believes that Strabo, when he says "second Metaurus," alludes to the Umbrian Metaurus (5. 2. 10) as the first, and that the copyist, unaware of this fact, deliberately changed "Medma" to Metaurus" i
Cyprus (Cyprus) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
ad 1.185) quotes "the geographer" (i.e., Strabo; see note 1, p. 320) as making the saying apply to "those who are unduly wroth, or very severe when they should not be." that they are "beset by the hero of Temesa." But when the Epizephyrian Locrians captured the city, Euthymus, the pugilist, so the story goes, entered the lists against Polites, defeated him in the fight and forced him to release the natives from the tribute. People say that Homer has in mind this Temesa, not the Tamassus in Cyprus (the name is spelled both ways), when he says "to Temesa, in quest of copper."Hom. Od. 1.184 And in fact copper mines are to be seen in the neighborhood, although now they have been abandoned. Near Temesa is Terina, which Hannibal destroyed, because he was unable to guard it, at the time when he had taken refuge in Brettium itself. Then comes Consentia, the metropolis of the Brettii; and a little above this city is Pandosia, a strong fortress, near which Alexander the MolossianCp. 6. 3.
Rhegium (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 1
ea, the sea which is called the Sicilian Sea. Rhegium was founded by the Chalcidians who, it is sailo bade them go forth with the Chalcidians to Rhegium, and to be grateful to his sister; for, he anaxilas (also spelled Anaxilaüs) was ruler of Rhegium from 494 to 476 B.C. (Diod. Sic. 11.48). werentium also took its name from the Morgetes of Rhegium.Cp. 6. 2. 4. The Latin name of this Sicilianto another Murgantia in Samnium. The city of Rhegium was once very powerful and had many dependenchich of the two explanations is true, whether Rhegium got its name on account of this or on accountt have called it by the Latin word for "royal,"Regium. because their progenitors had shared in the g it is now fairly populous. As one sails from Rhegium towards the east, and at a distance of fifty Locri first pitched camp. The distance from Rhegium to Locri is six hundred stadia. The city is ra. Timaeus says that Eunomus and Ariston of Rhegium were once contesting with each other at the P[5 more...]
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