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Gardner (Ohio, United States) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
, Strabo takes no account. In the case of those who sail across from Greece or Asia, the more direct route is to Brentesium, and, in fact, all who propose to go to Rome by land put into port here. There are two roadsOn these roads see Ashby and Gardner, The Via Trajana, Paper of the British School at Rome, 1916, Vol.VIII, No. 5, pp. 107 ff. from here: one, a mule-road through the countries of the Peucetii (who are called Poedicli),Cp. 6. 3. 1. the Daunii, and the Samnitae as far as Beneventumither, and for this reason neither should I myself make positive assertions about them. From Barium to the Aufidus River, on which is the Emporium of the CanusitaeThis Emporium should probably be identified with the Canne of today (see Ashby and Gardner, op. cit., p. 156). is four hundred stadia and the voyage inland to Emporium is ninety. Near by is also Salapia,Now Salpi. the seaport of the Argyrippini. For not far above the sea (in the plain, at all events) are situated two cities, Canusiu
Mother Earth (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
is situated at the edge of the Salentine territory, and the trip thither from Taras is for the most part easier to make on foot than by sailing. Thence to Leuca eighty stadia; this, too, is a small town, and in it is to be seen a fountain of malodorous water; the mythical story is told that those of the Giants who survived at the Campanian PhlegraSee 5. 4. 4 and 5. 4. 6. and are called the Leuternian Giants were driven out by Heracles, and on fleeing hither for refuge were shrouded by Mother Earth, and the fountain gets its malodorous stream from the ichor of their bodies; and for this reason, also, the seaboard here is called Leuternia. Again, from Leuca to Hydrus,Also called Hydruntum; now Otranto. a small town, one hundred and fifty stadia. Thence to Brentesium four hundred; and it is an equal distance to the island Sason,Now Sasena. which is situated about midway of the distance across from Epeirus to Brentesium. And therefore those who cannot accomplish the straight voya
called by the special name of Apuli, although they speak the same language as the Daunii and the Peucetii, and do not differ from them in any other respect either, at the present time at least, although it is reasonable to suppose that in early times they differed and that this is the source of the three diverse names for them that are now prevalent. In earlier times this whole country was prosperous, but it was laid waste by Hannibal and the later wars. And here too occurred the battle of Cannae, in which the Romans and their allies suffered a very great loss of life. On the gulf is a lake; and above the lake, in the interior, is Teanum Apulum,Passo di Civita. which has the same name as Teanum Sidicinum. At this point the breadth of Italy seems to be considerably contracted, since from here to the region of DicaearcheiaPuteoli. an isthmus is left of less than one thousand stadia from sea to sea. After the lake comes the voyage along the coast to the country of the Frentani and t
Syracuse (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
a Luecanian about 330 B.C. (cp. 6. 1. 5). the Molossian to lead them in their war against the Messapians and Leucanians, and, still before that, for Archidamus,Archidamus III, king of Sparta, was born about 400 B.C. and lost his life in 338 B.C. in this war. the son of Agesilaüs, and, later on, for Cleonymus,Little is know of this Cleonymus, save that he was the son of Cleomenes II, who reigned at Sparta 370-309 B.C. and Agathocles,Agathocles (b. about 361 B.C.—d. 289 B.C.) was a tyrant of Syracuse. He appears to have led the Tarantini about 300 B.C. and then for Pyrrhus,Pyrrhus (about 318-272 B.C.), king of Epeirus, accepted the invitation of Tarentum in 281 B.C. at the time when they formed a league with him against the Romans. And yet even to those whom they called in they could not yield a ready obedience, and would set them at enmity. At all events, it was out of enmity that Alexander tried to transfer to Thurian territory the general festival assembly of all Greek peoples in
Aquileia (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
, whereas according to Artemidorus they amount to more; and thence to Ancona two hundred and fifty-four miles according to the former, whereas according to Artemidorus the distance to the Aesis River, which is near Ancona, is one thousand two hundred and fifty stadia, a much shorter distance. Polybius states that the distance from Iapygia has been marked out by miles, and that the distance to the city of SenaSena Gallica; now Sinigaglia. is five hundred and sixty-two miles, and thence to Aquileia one hundred and seventy-eight. And they do not agree with the commonly accepted distance along the Illyrian coastline, from the Ceraunian Mountains to the recess of the Adrias,The Adriatic. since they represent this latter coasting voyage as over six thousand stadia,Polybius here gives the total length of the coastline on the Italian side as 740 miles, or 6,166 stadia (8 1/3 stadia to the mile; see 7. 7. 4), and elsewhere (2. 4. 3) Strabo quotes him as reckoning the length of the Illyrian
also Salapia,Now Salpi. the seaport of the Argyrippini. For not far above the sea (in the plain, at all events) are situated two cities, CanusiumNow Canosa. and Argyrippa,Now Arpino. which in earlier times were the largest of the Italiote cities, as is clear from the circuits of their walls. Now, however, Argyrippa is smaller; iArgyrippa is smaller; it was called Argos Hippium at first, then Argyrippa, and then by the present name Arpi. Both are said to have been founded by Diomedes.Cp. 5. 1. 9. And as signs of the dominion of Diomedes in these regions are to be seen the Plain of Diomedes and many other things, among which are the old votive offerings in the temple of Athene Argyrippa, and then by the present name Arpi. Both are said to have been founded by Diomedes.Cp. 5. 1. 9. And as signs of the dominion of Diomedes in these regions are to be seen the Plain of Diomedes and many other things, among which are the old votive offerings in the temple of Athene at Luceria—a place which likewise was in ancient times a city of the Daunii, but is now reduced—and, in the sea near by, two islands that are called the Islands of Diomedes, of which one is inhabited, while the other, it is said, is desert; on the latter, according to certain narrators of myths, Diomedes was caused to disappear, a
now lost. but according to the Chorographer,See 5. 2. 7 and footnote. the distances from Brentesium as far as GarganumMonte Gargano. amount to one hundred and sixty-five miles, whereas according to Artemidorus they amount to more; and thence to Ancona two hundred and fifty-four miles according to the former, whereas according to Artemidorus the distance to the Aesis River, which is near Ancona, is one thousand two hundred and fifty stadia, a much shorter distance. Polybius states that the disAncona, is one thousand two hundred and fifty stadia, a much shorter distance. Polybius states that the distance from Iapygia has been marked out by miles, and that the distance to the city of SenaSena Gallica; now Sinigaglia. is five hundred and sixty-two miles, and thence to Aquileia one hundred and seventy-eight. And they do not agree with the commonly accepted distance along the Illyrian coastline, from the Ceraunian Mountains to the recess of the Adrias,The Adriatic. since they represent this latter coasting voyage as over six thousand stadia,Polybius here gives the total length of the coastli
e present time at least, although it is reasonable to suppose that in early times they differed and that this is the source of the three diverse names for them that are now prevalent. In earlier times this whole country was prosperous, but it was laid waste by Hannibal and the later wars. And here too occurred the battle of Cannae, in which the Romans and their allies suffered a very great loss of life. On the gulf is a lake; and above the lake, in the interior, is Teanum Apulum,Passo di Civita. which has the same name as Teanum Sidicinum. At this point the breadth of Italy seems to be considerably contracted, since from here to the region of DicaearcheiaPuteoli. an isthmus is left of less than one thousand stadia from sea to sea. After the lake comes the voyage along the coast to the country of the Frentani and to Buca;Now Termoli. and the distance from the lake either to Buca or to Cape Garganum is two hundred stadia. As for the places that come next after Buca, I have alread
m Brentesium as far as GarganumMonte Gargano. amount to one hundred and sixty-five miles, whereas according to Artemidorus they amount to more; and thence to Ancona two hundred and fifty-four miles according to the former, whereas according to Artemidorus the distance to the Aesis River, which is near Ancona, is one thousand two hundred and fifty stadia, a much shorter distance. Polybius states that the distance from Iapygia has been marked out by miles, and that the distance to the city of SenaSena Gallica; now Sinigaglia. is five hundred and sixty-two miles, and thence to Aquileia one hundred and seventy-eight. And they do not agree with the commonly accepted distance along the Illyrian coastline, from the Ceraunian Mountains to the recess of the Adrias,The Adriatic. since they represent this latter coasting voyage as over six thousand stadia,Polybius here gives the total length of the coastline on the Italian side as 740 miles, or 6,166 stadia (8 1/3 stadia to the mile; see 7.
ve to thee Satyrium, both to take up thine abode in the rich land of Taras and to become a bane to the Iapygians." Accordingly, the Partheniae went thither with Phalanthus, and they were welcomed by both the barbarians and the Cretans who had previously taken possession of the place. These latter, it is said, are the people who sailed with Minos to Sicily, and, after his death, which occurred at the home of Cocalus in Camici,Cp. 6. 2. 6. set sail from Sicily; but on the voyage backBack to Crete. they were driven out of their course to Taras, although later some of them went afoot around the AdriasThe Adriatic. as far as Macedonia and were called Bottiaeans. But all the people as far as Daunia, it is said, were called Iapyges, after Iapyx, who is said to have been the son of Daedalus by a Cretan woman and to have been the leader of the Cretans. The city of Taras, however, was named after some hero. But Ephorus describes the founding of the city thus: The Lacedaemonians were at wa
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