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Gnathia (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
l across from Greece or Asia, the more direct route is to Brentesium, and, in fact, all who propose to go to Rome by land put into port here. There are two roadsOn these roads see Ashby and Gardner, The Via Trajana, Paper of the British School at Rome, 1916, Vol.VIII, No. 5, pp. 107 ff. from here: one, a mule-road through the countries of the Peucetii (who are called Poedicli),Cp. 6. 3. 1. the Daunii, and the Samnitae as far as Beneventum; on this road is the city of Egnatia,Also spelled Gnathia, Gnatia, and Ignatia; now Torre d'Agnazzo. and then, Celia,Also spelled Caelia; now Ceglie di Bari. Netium,Now Noja. Canusium, and Herdonia.Now Ordona. But the road by way of Taras, lying slightly to the left of the other, though as much as one day's journey out of the way when one has made the circuit,i.e., to the point where it meets the other road, near Beneventum. what is called the Appian Way, is better for carriages. On this road are the cities of Uria and Venusia, the former betw
Termoli (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
though it is reasonable to suppose that in early times they differed and that this is the source of the three diverse names for them that are now prevalent. In earlier times this whole country was prosperous, but it was laid waste by Hannibal and the later wars. And here too occurred the battle of Cannae, in which the Romans and their allies suffered a very great loss of life. On the gulf is a lake; and above the lake, in the interior, is Teanum Apulum,Passo di Civita. which has the same name as Teanum Sidicinum. At this point the breadth of Italy seems to be considerably contracted, since from here to the region of DicaearcheiaPuteoli. an isthmus is left of less than one thousand stadia from sea to sea. After the lake comes the voyage along the coast to the country of the Frentani and to Buca;Now Termoli. and the distance from the lake either to Buca or to Cape Garganum is two hundred stadia. As for the places that come next after Buca, I have already mentioned them.5. 4. 2.
Tarentum (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
d it, for most of them were either destroyed by the Carthaginians when they took the city or carried off as booty by the Romans when they took the place by storm.Tarentum revolted from Rome to Hannibal during the Second Punic War, but was recaptured (209 B.C.) and severely dealt with. Among this booty is the Heracles in the Capit philosophy was embraced by them, but especially by Archytas,Archytas (about 427-347 B.C.), besides being chosen seven times as chief magistrate ("strategus") of Tarentum, was famous as general, Pythagorean philosopher, mathematician, and author. Aristotle and Aristoxenus wrote works on his life and writings, but both of these wo of Syracuse. He appears to have led the Tarantini about 300 B.C. and then for Pyrrhus,Pyrrhus (about 318-272 B.C.), king of Epeirus, accepted the invitation of Tarentum in 281 B.C. at the time when they formed a league with him against the Romans. And yet even to those whom they called in they could not yield a ready obedience,
Silvium (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
the common stopping-place for people who are travelling either by sea or land to Barium;Now Bari. and the voyage is made with the south wind. The country of the Peucetii extends only thus farTo Barium. on the sea, but in the interior as far as Silvium.Silvium appears to have been on the site of what is now Garagone. All of it is rugged and mountainous, since it embraces a large portion of the Apennine Mountains; and it is thought to have admitted Arcadians as colonists. From Brentesium to Silvium appears to have been on the site of what is now Garagone. All of it is rugged and mountainous, since it embraces a large portion of the Apennine Mountains; and it is thought to have admitted Arcadians as colonists. From Brentesium to Barium is about seven hundred stadia, and Taras is about an equal distance from each. The adjacent country is inhabited by the Daunii; and then come the Apuli, whose country extends as far as that of the Frentani. But since the terms "Peucetii" and "Daunii" are not at all used by the native inhabitants, except in early times, and since this country as a whole is now called Apulia, necessarily the boundaries of these tribes cannot be told to a nicety either, and for this reason neither should
Teanum Sidicinum (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
lthough it is reasonable to suppose that in early times they differed and that this is the source of the three diverse names for them that are now prevalent. In earlier times this whole country was prosperous, but it was laid waste by Hannibal and the later wars. And here too occurred the battle of Cannae, in which the Romans and their allies suffered a very great loss of life. On the gulf is a lake; and above the lake, in the interior, is Teanum Apulum,Passo di Civita. which has the same name as Teanum Sidicinum. At this point the breadth of Italy seems to be considerably contracted, since from here to the region of DicaearcheiaPuteoli. an isthmus is left of less than one thousand stadia from sea to sea. After the lake comes the voyage along the coast to the country of the Frentani and to Buca;Now Termoli. and the distance from the lake either to Buca or to Cape Garganum is two hundred stadia. As for the places that come next after Buca, I have already mentioned them.5. 4. 2.
Mondragone (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
road are the cities of Uria and Venusia, the former between Taras and Brentesium and the latter on the confines of the Samnitae and the Leucani. Both the roads from Brentesium meet near Beneventum and Campania. And the common road from here on, as far as Rome, is called the Appian Way, and passes through Caudium,Now Montesarchio. Calatia,Now Galazze. Capua,The old Santa Maria di Capua, now in ruins; not the Capua of today, which is on the site of Casilinum. and Casilinum to Sinuessa.Now Mondragone. And the places from there on I have already mentioned. The total length of the road from Rome to Brentesium is three hundred and sixty miles. But there is also a third road, which runs from Rhegium through the countries of the Brettii, the Leucani, and the Samnitae into Campania, where it joins the Appian Way; it passes through the Apennine Mountains and it requires three or four days more than the road from Brentesium. The voyage from Brentesium to the opposite mainland is made eithe
Bruttium (Italy) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
although if they disembark, they go afoot by a shorter route by way of Rodiae,Also called Rudiae; now Rugge. a Greek city, where the poet Ennius was born. So then, the district one sails around in going from Taras to Brentesium resembles a peninsula, and the overland journey from Brentesium to Taras, which is only a one day's journey for a man well-girt, forms the isthmus of the aforesaid peninsula;6. 3. 1. and this peninsula most people call by one general name Messapia, or Iapygia, or Calabria, or Salentina, although some divide it up, as I have said before.6. 3. 1. So much, then, for the towns on the seacoast. In the interior are Rodiae and Lupiae, and, slightly above the sea, Aletia; and at the middle of the isthmus, Uria, in which is still to be seen the palace of one of the chieftains. When Herodotus7. 170. states that Hyria is in Iapygia and was founded by the Cretans who strayed from the fleet of Minos when on its way to Sicily,Cp. 6. 3. 2. we must understand Hyria to be
Iapygian Cape)Cape Leuca. the country of the Salentini, and the other the country of the Calabri. Above these latter, on the north, are the Peucetii and also those people who in the Greek language are called Daunii, but the natives give the name Apulia to the whole country that comes after that of the Calabri, though some of them, particularly the Peucetii, are called Poedicli also. Messapia forms a sort of peninsula, since it is enclosed by the isthmus that extends from BrentesiumSee 5. 3. 6 ii; and then come the Apuli, whose country extends as far as that of the Frentani. But since the terms "Peucetii" and "Daunii" are not at all used by the native inhabitants, except in early times, and since this country as a whole is now called Apulia, necessarily the boundaries of these tribes cannot be told to a nicety either, and for this reason neither should I myself make positive assertions about them. From Barium to the Aufidus River, on which is the Emporium of the CanusitaeThis Empori
Cnossus (Greece) (search for this): book 6, chapter 3
or are Rodiae and Lupiae, and, slightly above the sea, Aletia; and at the middle of the isthmus, Uria, in which is still to be seen the palace of one of the chieftains. When Herodotus7. 170. states that Hyria is in Iapygia and was founded by the Cretans who strayed from the fleet of Minos when on its way to Sicily,Cp. 6. 3. 2. we must understand Hyria to be either Uria or Veretum. Brentesium, they say, was further colonized by the Cretans, whether by those who came over with Theseus from Cnossus or by those who set sail from Sicily with Iapyx (the story is told both ways), although they did not stay together there, it is said, but went off to Bottiaea.Cp. 6. 3. 2, where Antiochus says that some of them went to Bottiaea. Later on, however, when ruled by kings, the city lost much of its country to the Lacedaemonians who were under the leadership of Phalanthus; but still, when he was ejected from Taras, he was admitted by the Brentesini, and when he died was counted by them worthy o
r should I myself make positive assertions about them. From Barium to the Aufidus River, on which is the Emporium of the CanusitaeThis Emporium should probably be identified with the Canne of today (see Ashby and Gardner, op. cit., p. 156). is four hundred stadia and the voyage inland to Emporium is ninety. Near by is also Salapia,Now Salpi. the seaport of the Argyrippini. For not far above the sea (in the plain, at all events) are situated two cities, CanusiumNow Canosa. and Argyrippa,Now Arpino. which in earlier times were the largest of the Italiote cities, as is clear from the circuits of their walls. Now, however, Argyrippa is smaller; it was called Argos Hippium at first, then Argyrippa, and then by the present name Arpi. Both are said to have been founded by Diomedes.Cp. 5. 1. 9. And as signs of the dominion of Diomedes in these regions are to be seen the Plain of Diomedes and many other things, among which are the old votive offerings in the temple of Athene at Luceria—a
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