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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). Search the whole document.

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Olympus (Greece) (search for this): book 21, card 361
r the sake of mortals." When she had thus spoken Hephaistos quenched his flames, and the river went back once more into his own fair bed. Xanthos was now beaten, so these two left off fighting, for Hera stayed them though she was still angry; but a furious quarrel broke out among the other gods, for they were of divided counsels. They fell on one another with a mighty uproar - earth groaned, and the spacious firmament rang out as with a blare of trumpets. Zeus heard as he was sitting on Olympus, and laughed for joy when he saw the gods coming to blows among themselves. They were not long about beginning, and Ares piercer of shields opened the battle. Sword in hand he sprang at once upon Athena and reviled her. "Why, vixen," said he, "have you again set the gods by the ears in the pride and haughtiness of your heart? Have you forgotten how you set Diomedes son of Tydeus on to wound me, and yourself took visible spear and drove it into me to the hurt of my fair body? You shall now s
Xanthos (Turkey) (search for this): book 21, card 361
as he spoke, and all his waters were seething. As a cauldron upon ‘a large fire boils when it is melting the lard of some fatted hog, and the lard keeps bubbling up all over when the dry faggots blaze under it - even so were the goodly waters of Xanthos heated with the fire till they were boiling. He could flow no longer but stayed his stream, so afflicted was he by the blasts of fire which cunning Hephaistos had raised. Then he prayed to Hera and besought her saying, "Hera, why should your sonon Hephaistos, "Son Hephaistos, hold now your flames; we ought not to use such violence against a god for the sake of mortals." When she had thus spoken Hephaistos quenched his flames, and the river went back once more into his own fair bed. Xanthos was now beaten, so these two left off fighting, for Hera stayed them though she was still angry; but a furious quarrel broke out among the other gods, for they were of divided counsels. They fell on one another with a mighty uproar - earth groan
o longer but stayed his stream, so afflicted was he by the blasts of fire which cunning Hephaistos had raised. Then he prayed to Hera and besought her saying, "Hera, why should your son vex my stream with such especial fury? I am not so much responsible [aitios] as all the others are who have been helping the Trojans. I will leave off, since you so desire it, and let son leave off also. Furthermore I swear never again will I do anything to save the Trojans from destruction, not even when all Troy is burning in the flames which the Achaeans will kindle." As soon as Hera heard this she said to her son Hephaistos, "Son Hephaistos, hold now your flames; we ought not to use such violence against a god for the sake of mortals." When she had thus spoken Hephaistos quenched his flames, and the river went back once more into his own fair bed. Xanthos was now beaten, so these two left off fighting, for Hera stayed them though she was still angry; but a furious quarrel broke out among the