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eir religious feeling was such that they did not hesitate to add to the votive offering a tenth of the produce of the land that had already been sold, as well as of the spoils. With the money thus obtained they sent to the temple of Delphi a golden cup which stood on a pedestal of brass in the treasury of Rome and MassiliatMarseilles. until Onomarchus melted the cup during the Phocæan war. The pedestal is still standing.Y.R. 363 Camillus was afterwards accused before the people of B.C. 391 being himself the author of those bad omens and portents. The people, who had been for some time set against him, fined him heavily, having no pity for him although he had recently lost a son. His friends contributed the money in order that the person of Camillus might not be disgraced. In deep grief he went into exile in the city of Ardea, praying the prayer of Achilles that the time might come when the Romans would long for Camillus. And in fact this came Y.R. 365 to pass very soon, for whe
Fragments FROM SUIDAS The Volsci, in nowise terrified by the misfortunes of their neighbors, made war against the Romans and laid siege to their colonies. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 263The people refused to elect Marcius (Coriolanus) when B.C. 491 he sought the consulship, not because they considered him unfit, but because they feared his domineering spirit. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 265Marcius being inflamed against the Romans when they B.C. 489 banished him went over to the Volsci, meditating no small revenge. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 266When he arrived there, having renounced his own country B.C. 488 and kin, he did not meditate anything in particular, but intended to side with the Volsci against his country.Mendelssohn considers this whole fragment corrupt. FROM "THE EMBASSIES" When Marcius had been banished, and had taken refuge with the Volsci, and made war against t
FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 263The people refused to elect Marcius (Coriolanus) when B.C. 491 he sought the consulship, not because they considered him unfit, but because they feared his domineering spirit. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 265Marcius being inflamed against the Romans when they B.C. 489 banished him went over to the Volsci, meditating no small revenge. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 266When he arrived there, having renounced his own country B.C. 488 and kin, he did not meditate anything in particular, but intended to side with the Volsci against his country.Mendelssohn considers this whole fragment corrupt. FROM "THE EMBASSIES" When Marcius had been banished, and had taken refuge with the Volsci, and made war against the Romans, and was encamped at a distance of only four hundred stades from the city, the people threatened to betray the walls to the enemy unless the Senate would send an embassy to him to tre
s FROM SUIDAS The Volsci, in nowise terrified by the misfortunes of their neighbors, made war against the Romans and laid siege to their colonies. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 263The people refused to elect Marcius (Coriolanus) when B.C. 491 he sought the consulship, not because they considered him unfit, but because they feared his domineering spirit. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 265Marcius being inflamed against the Romans when they B.C. 489 banished him went over to the Volsci, meditating no small revenge. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 266When he arrived there, having renounced his own country B.C. 488 and kin, he did not meditate anything in particular, but intended to side with the Volsci against his country.Mendelssohn considers this whole fragment corrupt. FROM "THE EMBASSIES" When Marcius had been banished, and had taken refuge with the Volsci, and made war against the Romans, and
1 from remembrance of old wrongs, and refused to obey him. They fought badly on purpose, and took to flight, putting bandages on their bodies as though they were wounded. They broke up camp and tried to retreat, putting the blame on the unskilfulness of their commander. FROM PEIRESC Bad omens from Jupiter were observed after the capture of Veii. The soothsayers said that some religious duty had Y.R. 359 been neglected, and Camillus remembered that it had been B.C. 395 forgotten to appropriate a tenth of the plunder to the god that had given the oracle concerning the lake. Accordingly the Senate decreed that those who had taken anything from Veii should make an estimate, each one for himself, and bring in a tenth of it under oath. Their religious feeling was such that they did not hesitate to add to the votive offering a tenth of the produce of the land that had already been sold, as well as of the spoils. With the money thus obtained they sent to the templ
e for their bravery. For it was a great misfortune to the Romans, on account of their number, the dignity of a noble house, and its total destruction. The day on which it happened was ever after considered unlucky.The tale of the Fabian family and their voluntary assumption of the war against the Veientians, and their total destruction in an ambuscade is related in Livy, ii. 48-50. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 283The army was incensed against the general (Appius Claudius) B.C. 471 from remembrance of old wrongs, and refused to obey him. They fought badly on purpose, and took to flight, putting bandages on their bodies as though they were wounded. They broke up camp and tried to retreat, putting the blame on the unskilfulness of their commander. FROM PEIRESC Bad omens from Jupiter were observed after the capture of Veii. The soothsayers said that some religious duty had Y.R. 359 been neglected, and Camillus remembered that it had been B.C. 3
when the Romans would long for Camillus. And in fact this came Y.R. 365 to pass very soon, for when the Gauls captured the city, the B.C. 389 people fled for succor to Camillus and again chose him Dictator, as has been told in my Gallic history.Livy, v. 32 seq. Plutarch, Life of Camillus. FROM PEIRESC When Marcus Manlius, the patrician, saved the city of Rome from a Gallic invasion, he received the highest honors. Y.R. 370 At a later period when he saw an old man, who had often B.C. 384 fought for his country, reduced to servitude by a money lender, he paid the debt for him. Being highly commended for this act, he released all his own debtors from their obligations. His glory being much increased thereby, he paid the debts of many others. Being much elated by his popularity, he even proposed that all debts should be cancelled, or that the people should sell the lands that had not yet been distributed and apply the proceeds for the relief of debtors.
pe that he might be able to persuade the Volsci, but on account of the jealousy of their leader Attius he was put to death.The tale of Coriolanus is found in Livy, ii. 35-41, and at greater length in Dionysius of Halicarnassus, book viii.; also in Plutarch, Life of Coriolanus. FROM SUIDAS Marcius did not think proper to gainsay either of these [demands]. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 275(The Fabii) were as much to be pitied for their misfortunes B.C. 479 as they were worthy of praise for their bravery. For it was a great misfortune to the Romans, on account of their number, the dignity of a noble house, and its total destruction. The day on which it happened was ever after considered unlucky.The tale of the Fabian family and their voluntary assumption of the war against the Veientians, and their total destruction in an ambuscade is related in Livy, ii. 48-50. FROM SUIDAS Y.R. 283The army was incensed against the ge
mens and portents. The people, who had been for some time set against him, fined him heavily, having no pity for him although he had recently lost a son. His friends contributed the money in order that the person of Camillus might not be disgraced. In deep grief he went into exile in the city of Ardea, praying the prayer of Achilles that the time might come when the Romans would long for Camillus. And in fact this came Y.R. 365 to pass very soon, for when the Gauls captured the city, the B.C. 389 people fled for succor to Camillus and again chose him Dictator, as has been told in my Gallic history.Livy, v. 32 seq. Plutarch, Life of Camillus. FROM PEIRESC When Marcus Manlius, the patrician, saved the city of Rome from a Gallic invasion, he received the highest honors. Y.R. 370 At a later period when he saw an old man, who had often B.C. 384 fought for his country, reduced to servitude by a money lender, he paid the debt for him. Being highly commended for th