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Browsing named entities in a specific section of E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). Search the whole document.

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m exsilvisse sagittas. septemgeminus: as having seven mouths; cf. Verg. A. 6.800 septemgemini ostia Nili ; Ov. Met. 1.422 ubi deseruit madidos septemfluus agros Nilus ; Ov. Met. 5.187 genitum septemplice Nilo. colorat aequora: by its muddy waters, which, in their overflow, still fertilize the fields of Egypt; cf. Verg. G. 4.291 [Nilus] viridem Aegyptum nigra fecundat harena. In this and the two following verses is a trace of the reconciliation of Catullus to Caesar; cf. Intr. 38ff. The poet could not yet sing Caesar's praises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta
ive bellum] Hircanis Arabisve parant seu tendere ad Indos. Arabas molles: so called from their proverbial riches and luxury; cf. Verg. G. 1.57 molles sua tura Sabaci [mittunt] ; Tib. 2.2.3 urantur odores qusi tener mittit Arabs. Sacas: a nomadic people, called Scythians by the Greeks, dwelling far to the north-east of Parthia and Bactria; cf. Plin. NH 6.17.50 celeberrimi eorum [Scytharum] Sacae , etc. sagittiferos Parthos: with reference, as very often in Latin literature, to the traditional weapon and manner of fighting of these most dreaded enemies of Rome; cf. Hor. Carm. 2.13.17 miles [timet] sagittas et celerem fugam Parthi ; Ov. Rem. Am. 157 vince Cupidineas pariter Part
all-encircling ocean-stream at the extreme East; cf. Ov. Fast. 6.474 vigil Eois lucifer exit aquis ; Tib. 4.2.20 proximus Eois Indus aquis ; Verg. G. 2.122 quos Oceano propior gerit India lucos. Hyrcanos: a people dwelling by the southern end of the Caspian Sea (Mare Hyrcanum), joined by Vergil with the Arabians and Indians as distant enemies of Rome; cf. Verg. A. 7.605 [sive bellum] Hircanis Arabisve parant seu tendere ad Indos. Arabas molles: so called from their proverbial riches and luxury; cf. Verg. G. 1.57 molles sua tura Sabaci [mittunt] ; Tib. 2.2.3 urantur odores qusi tener mittit Arabs. Sacas: a nomadic people, called Scythians by the Greeks, dw
France (France) (search for this): text comm, poem 11
sing Caesar's praises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta: the places mentioned are themselves the reminders of Caesar's greatness. Gallicum: the Rhine is so styled since it was the boundary of Caesar's great conquests, and not with reference to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 5
In this and the two following verses is a trace of the reconciliation of Catullus to Caesar; cf. Intr. 38ff. The poet could not yet sing Caesar's praises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta: the places mentioned are themselves the reminders of Caesar's greatness. Gallicum: the Rhine is so styled since it was the boundary of Caesar's great conquests, and not with reference to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg.
Germany (Germany) (search for this): text comm, poem 11
aises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta: the places mentioned are themselves the reminders of Caesar's greatness. Gallicum: the Rhine is so styled since it was the boundary of Caesar's great conquests, and not with reference to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 55 B.C.
Great Britain (United Kingdom) (search for this): text comm, poem 11
ce to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 55 B.C. Apparently Furius and Aurelius, at the suggestion of Lesbia, tendered their services in bringing about a reconciliation with her; but Catullus thoroughly despises them for their actions in the past (cf. Intr. 37), and employs them as comites on only one, and that a final, errand, - to convey to Lesbia his decision against her appeal. meae puellae: in h
Aurelius (New York, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 11
f.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 55 B.C. Apparently Furius and Aurelius, at the suggestion of Lesbia, tendered their services in bringing about a reconciliation with her; but Catullus thoroughly despises them for their actions in the past (cf. Intr. 37), and employs them as comites on only one, and that a final, errand, - to convey to Lesbia his decision against her appeal. meae puellae: in half-scornful, half-mournful reminiscence of such passages as Catul. 2.1 and Catul. 3.3; cf. th
longe resonante: far-echoing. Eoa unda: i.e. the all-encircling ocean-stream at the extreme East; cf. Ov. Fast. 6.474 vigil Eois lucifer exit aquis ; Tib. 4.2.20 proximus Eois Indus aquis ; Verg. G. 2.122 quos Oceano propior gerit India lucos. Hyrcanos: a people dwelling by the southern end of the Caspian Sea (Mare Hyrcanum), joined by Vergil with the Arabians and Indians as distant enemies of Rome; cf. Verg. A. 7.605 [sive bellum] Hircanis Arabisve parant seu tendere ad Indos. Arabas molles: so called from their proverbial riches and luxury; cf. Verg. G. 1.57 molles sua tura Sabaci [mittunt] ; Tib. 2.2.3 urantur odores qusi tener mittit A
Bactria (Afghanistan) (search for this): text comm, poem 11
Hircanis Arabisve parant seu tendere ad Indos. Arabas molles: so called from their proverbial riches and luxury; cf. Verg. G. 1.57 molles sua tura Sabaci [mittunt] ; Tib. 2.2.3 urantur odores qusi tener mittit Arabs. Sacas: a nomadic people, called Scythians by the Greeks, dwelling far to the north-east of Parthia and Bactria; cf. Plin. NH 6.17.50 celeberrimi eorum [Scytharum] Sacae , etc. sagittiferos Parthos: with reference, as very often in Latin literature, to the traditional weapon and manner of fighting of these most dreaded enemies of Rome; cf. Hor. Carm. 2.13.17 miles [timet] sagittas et celerem fugam Parthi ; Ov. Rem. Am. 157 vince Cupidineas pariter Parthasque
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