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Frater Ave atque Vale.—Date, summer of 56 B.C.—Meter, choliambic. paene: used adjectivally, in Greek fashion; cf. Cic. Rep. 6.11 nunc venis paene miles ; Ov. Her. 15.357 paene puer. Livy 26.42.8 appears to be the first to write paeninsula. Sirmio, the modern Sermione, is a long and narrow peninsula running out into the southern end of the Lago di Garda (Lacus Benacus). The ruins referred to by Tennyson (l.c.) are of the age of Constantine, but are called by the natives the Villa of Catullus in accordance with the mediaeval identification ocelle: the gem cf. in this sense Aesch. Eum. 1025 o)/mma pa/shs xqo/nos ; Pind. Ol 2.9 *sikeli/as t' e)/san o)fqalmo/s ; Plaut. Trin. 245 o ocel
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 31
(the speaker here also has just returned from a foreign shore), and at the end of dedicatory inscriptions, e.g. C I L 6.533 POSVIT·L·L (i.e. laetus lubens) inviso: in the sense of (poetical) video a rare use; cf. however Catul. 64.233, Cic. ND 2.43.110 et natos Geminos invises sub caput Arcti. Thyniam: the Thyni, a people from Thrace, are said to have settled that portion of Bithynia which lay close to the Thracian Bosphorus and was sometimes said to be divided from Bithynia proper by the river Psilis; but the two names, long before the time of Catullus, had ceased to express any actual distinction. liquisse: for reliquisse, as not infrequently in Catullus (cf. e.g. Catul. 46.4); but in Catul. 35.3 and elsewhere relinquere occurs.
On the delight of homecoming. The poem is a most unartificial and joyous pouring out of the poet's warmth of feeling at reaching Sirmio after his year of absence with Memmius in Bithynia (v. 5), and forms a perfect conclusion to Catul. 46.1ff., while it is itself supplemented by the quieter reminiscent strains of Catul. 4.1ff. With this and Catul. 101.1ff. cf. Tennyson Frater Ave atque Vale.—Date, summer of 56 B.C.—Meter, choliambally, in Greek fashion; cf. Cic. Rep. 6.11 nunc venis paene miles ; Ov. Her. 15.357 paene puer. Livy 26.42.8 appears to be the first to write paeninsula. Sirmio, the modern Sermione, is a long and narrow peninsula running out into the southern end of the Lago di Garda (Lacus Benacus). The ruins referred to by Tennyson (l.c.) are of the age of Constantine,
Bithynia (Turkey) (search for this): text comm, poem 31
m is a most unartificial and joyous pouring out of the poet's warmth of feeling at reaching Sirmio after his year of absence with Memmius in Bithynia (v. 5), and forms a perfect conclusion to Catul. 46.1ff., while it is itself supplemented by the quieter reminiscent strains of Catul. 4.1ff. With b caput Arcti. Thyniam: the Thyni, a people from Thrace, are said to have settled that portion of Bithynia which lay close to the Thracian Bosphorus and was sometimes said to be divided from Bithynia proper by the river Psilis; but the two nameBithynia proper by the river Psilis; but the two names, long before the time of Catullus, had ceased to express any actual distinction. liquisse: for reliquisse, as not infrequently in Catullus (cf. e.g. Catul. 46.4); but in Catul. 35.3 and elsewhere relinquere occurs. quid est beatius: cf. Catul. 9.
Frater Ave atque Vale.—Date, summer of 56 B.C.—Meter, choliambic. paene: used adjectivally, in Greek fashion; cf. Cic. Rep. 6.11 nunc venis paene miles ; Ov. Her. 15.357 paene puer. Livy 26.42.8 appears to be the first to write paeninsula. Sirmio, the modern Sermione, is a long and narrow peninsula running out into the southern end of the Lago di Garda (Lacus Benacus). The ruins referred to by Tennyson (l.c.) are of the age of Constantine, but are called by the natives the Villa of Catullus in accordance with the mediaeval identification ocelle: the gem cf. in this sense Aesch. Eum. 1025 o)/mma pa/shs xqo/nos ; Pind. Ol 2.9 *sikeli/as t' e)/san o)fqalmo/s ; Plaut. Trin. 245 o ocelle mi