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tterance of the brotherly love that shudders at the grave; contrast the familiar sit tibi terra levis. te: etc. the fresh grief of the writer carries him away from his theme into an apostrophe to his dead brother. vita amabilior: cf. Catul. 64.215n. Daulias: so the transformed Philomela (Ov. Met. 6.424 ff.) was called, according to Thuc. 2.29, from Daulis, the town of Phocis, where Tereus lived; Homer, however (Hom. Od. 19.518 ff.), represents Itylus as the only son of Zethus, king of Thebes, by Aedon, daughter of Pandareus, king of Crete, and slain unwittingly by his own mother, who was jealous of the motherhood of Niobe, and supposed herself to be killinig Niobe's eldest son. sed tamen: after the long parenthesis the poet returns to his theme, sed, as ofte
theme into an apostrophe to his dead brother. vita amabilior: cf. Catul. 64.215n. Daulias: so the transformed Philomela (Ov. Met. 6.424 ff.) was called, according to Thuc. 2.29, from Daulis, the town of Phocis, where Tereus lived; Homer, however (Hom. Od. 19.518 ff.), represents Itylus as the only son of Zethus, king of Thebes, by Aedon, daughter of Pandareus, king of Crete, and slain unwittingly by his own mother, who was jealous of the motherhood of Niobe, and supposed herself to be killinig Niobe's eldest son. sed tamen: after the long parenthesis the poet returns to his theme, sed, as often, being resumptive. haec: probably Catul. 66.1ff. is referred to. expressa: translated; cf. Ter. Ad. 11 verbum de verbo expressum
Thebes (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 65
esh grief of the writer carries him away from his theme into an apostrophe to his dead brother. vita amabilior: cf. Catul. 64.215n. Daulias: so the transformed Philomela (Ov. Met. 6.424 ff.) was called, according to Thuc. 2.29, from Daulis, the town of Phocis, where Tereus lived; Homer, however (Hom. Od. 19.518 ff.), represents Itylus as the only son of Zethus, king of Thebes, by Aedon, daughter of Pandareus, king of Crete, and slain unwittingly by his own mother, who was jealous of the motherhood of Niobe, and supposed herself to be killinig Niobe's eldest son. sed tamen: after the long parenthesis the poet returns to his theme, sed, as often, being resumptive. haec: probably Catul. 66.1ff. is referred to. expressa: translated; cf.
e long parenthesis the poet returns to his theme, sed, as often, being resumptive. haec: probably Catul. 66.1ff. is referred to. expressa: translated; cf. Ter. Ad. 11 verbum de verbo expressum extulit . Battiadae: Callimachus, the famous Alexandrian scholar and poet at the court of Ptolemy Philadelphus, was the son of a certain Battus of Cyrene, and claimed descent from the founder of that city; cf. Catul. 7.4ff n.; Catul. 116.2. credita ventis: with the figure cf. Catul. 30.10n. ut: etc. the comparison is of the irrevocable swiftness with which the apple falls and the reminders vanish. missum munere: cf. Catul. 101.8 tradita munere . sponsi: the secrecy of t