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Alexandria (Egypt) (search for this): text comm, poem 66
ei= sunelqou=sa gevva=| pai=das *)hmaqi/wna kai\ *me/mnona , who was apparently identified mythically with the ostrich (cf. v. 54) as was Memnon himself with a certain species of black hawk (cf. Ov. Met. 13.600ff.). Arsinoes: Arsinoe was the sister-wife of Ptolemy Philadelphus, and was worshiped under the attributes of Aphrodite in a temple erected to her honor on the promontory of Zephyrion, between Alexandria and Canopus, whence she was called Zephyritis. No satisfactcry emendation of elocridicos has yet been proposed. ales equus: according to Pausanias Arsinoe was represented riding upon an ostrich; Paus. 9.31.1 th\n de\ *)arsino/hn strouqo\s fe/rei kalxh= tw=n a)pth/nwn . aetherias umbras: it was in the night that the lock disappeared. With aetherias in the sense of
accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but the anger of the king was appeased by the court astronomer, Conon, who said that he had descried it among the stars, where it must have been placed by divine agency. ToOv. Met. 13.600ff.). Arsinoes: Arsinoe was the sister-wife of Ptolemy Philadelphus, and was worshiped under the attributes of Aphrodite in a temple erected to her honor on the promontory of Zephyrion, between Alexandria and Canopus, whence she was called Zephyritis. No satisfactcry emendation of elocridicos has yet been proposed. ales equus: according to Pausanias Arsinoe was represented
construction of moods in Verg. Ecl. 3.16 quid domini faciant, audent cum talia fures? Chalybon: etc. cf. Callim. Frag. 35e *xalu/bwn w(s a)po/loito ge/nos, geio/qen a)nte/llonta kako\n futo\n oi(/ min e)/fhnan ; Hor. S. 2.1.42 o pater et rex Iuppiter, ut pereat positum robigine telum . The Chalybes here referred to are undoubtedly not those of Spain, but the tribe of iron-workers in Pontus; cf. Xen. Anab. 5.5.1 a)fiknou=ntai ei)s *xa/lubas. ou(=toi o)li/goi te h)=san kai\ o( bio/s h)=n toi=s plei/stois au)tw=n a)po\ sidhrei/as. fingere: the verb, usually applied to easily worked substances (such as wax and clay), is strongly contrasted with duritiem; the Chalybes worked against nature in learning to dig iron from the concealing earth, and to m
(reigned 247-222 B.C.), king of Egypt, had for her husband's safety vowed to the gods a lock of her hair, when, shortly after his accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but the anger of the king was appeased by . 2.11.16, etc. The war was to avenge the murder of Berenice, sister of Ptolemy Euergetes and widow of Antiochus Theos, by her step-son Seleucus Callinicus, who had in 246 B.C. succeeded his father on the throne of Syria. parentum gaudia: i.e. in their hope of descendants; cf. Catul. 64.379 f. ita me divi iverint: cf. Catul. 61.196; Catul. 97.1; and with the hyperbaton, Catul. 44.9. With
Canopus (Egypt) (search for this): text comm, poem 66
| pai=das *)hmaqi/wna kai\ *me/mnona , who was apparently identified mythically with the ostrich (cf. v. 54) as was Memnon himself with a certain species of black hawk (cf. Ov. Met. 13.600ff.). Arsinoes: Arsinoe was the sister-wife of Ptolemy Philadelphus, and was worshiped under the attributes of Aphrodite in a temple erected to her honor on the promontory of Zephyrion, between Alexandria and Canopus, whence she was called Zephyritis. No satisfactcry emendation of elocridicos has yet been proposed. ales equus: according to Pausanias Arsinoe was represented riding upon an ostrich; Paus. 9.31.1 th\n de\ *)arsino/hn strouqo\s fe/rei kalxh= tw=n a)pth/nwn . aetherias umbras: it was in the night that the lock disappeared. With aetherias in the sense of aerias cf.
Conon (United Kingdom) (search for this): text comm, poem 66
B.C.), king of Egypt, had for her husband's safety vowed to the gods a lock of her hair, when, shortly after his accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but the anger of the king was appeased by the court astronomer, Conon, who said that he had descried it among the stars, where it must have been placed by divine agency. To verify his words Conon pointed out the hitherto undistinguished minor constellation which is now known as Coma Berenices.—Date, about 59 B.C. (cf. introductory note to c. 65). omnia qui: the antecedent clause begins in v. 7. dispexit: descried; as distinguishing in the darkness, or amid the multitude of
in acknowledgment ot past favors, while the new vow was made for the future; or they may have been part of the vow to be paid in the future; cf. in either case the votorum nuncupatio of the Roman consuls at their entry upon office, and Hannibal's offering (Liv. 21.21.9). tetulisset: see Catul. 34.8n. Asiam: Ptolemy ravaged Asia Minor and the eastern districts, at least as far as the Euphrates; cf. Inscr. of Adule; Just. 27.3. caelesti reddita coetu: the lock speaks from its final resting-place among the stars, passing over the brief interval of deposit in the temple of Zephyritis. On the form coetu see Catul. 34.8n. pristina: of the past. novo: of the present; the lock has but lately reached its present seat, and is explaining to its mistress the cause
tive genius shows so little through it. Whether the obscurity of some passages in it is due to lack of care on the part of the translator, or to an excessive fidelity to the original, cannot be determined; but the general characteristics of Alexandrian poetry would lead us to refer the fault to Callimachus himself. The theme, a compound of court tradition and of astronomical knowledge, is as follows: Berenice, daughter of Magas, king of Cyrene, and wife of her cousin Ptolemy Euergetes (reigned 247-222 B.C.), king of Egypt, had for her husband's safety vowed to the gods a lock of her hair, when, shortly after his accession to the throne and marriage, the king was setting out on an expedition against Syria. Upon his safe return the vow was paid, and the tress deposited in the temple of the deified Arsinoe on the promontory of Zephyrion. Next morning, however, it had disappeared; but t
Asia Minor (Turkey) (search for this): text comm, poem 66
taurino sanguine: the sacrifices of cattle may have been in acknowledgment ot past favors, while the new vow was made for the future; or they may have been part of the vow to be paid in the future; cf. in either case the votorum nuncupatio of the Roman consuls at their entry upon office, and Hannibal's offering (Liv. 21.21.9). tetulisset: see Catul. 34.8n. Asiam: Ptolemy ravaged Asia Minor and the eastern districts, at least as far as the Euphrates; cf. Inscr. of Adule; Just. 27.3. caelesti reddita coetu: the lock speaks from its final resting-place among the stars, passing over the brief interval of deposit in the temple of Zephyritis. On the form coetu see Catul. 34.8n. pristina: of the past. novo: of the present; the lock has but lately reached i
retur . ut cedant: etc., in v. 2 the reference is to the apparent daily motion of the stars, due to the revolution of the earth on its axis; in v. 4, to their yearly motion with reference to the apparent position of the sun, due to the revolution of the earth about the sun. Triviam: cf. Catul. 34.15n. Latmia saxa: Selene was wont to meet secretly upon Mt. Latmus in Caria the beautiful shepherd Endymion, with whom she had fallen in love (cf. Paus. 5.1); sub saxa = in antrum. aerio: so Horace of the heavens, Hor. Carm. 1.28.5 aerias temptasse domos . me: the poem is a monologue spoken by the lock (v. 51) of Berenice's hair itself. ille: i.e. the person referred to in v. 1ff., me ille Conon corresponding t
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