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Brescia (Italy) (search for this): text comm, poem 67
epetition of idea in the adjectives cf. Catul. 64.64, Catul. 64.103, Catul. 64.221; Catul. 90.5; and (with Ellis) v. 48. zonam: etc. cf. Catul. 2.13n. Brixia: the modern Brescia, the capital of the (Gallic) Cenomani (Liv. 32.30). It is about as far to the westward of Sirmio as Verona is to the eastward (one half-hour by rail). —The remainder of the verse is involved in gr of Verona as a Gallic town; cf. Ptol. 3.1.27; Just. 20.5.8; not so, perhaps, Livy (Liv. 5.35.1), nor, certainly, Pliny (Plin. NH 3.130). The two men, evidently inhabitants of Brixia, are otherwise unknown. 37-40. A remark of the Door itself, which, having been fairly started on its story by v. 18, continues it to the end, preferring to anticipate rather than to await crit
This pasquinade, in the form of a conversation between the poet and the door of a certain house, abounds in difficulties of interpretation for us, though its directness of personal reference must have made it clear enough to the Veronese. Its tone of familiarity with, and personal interest in, the tittle-tattle of the city seems to indicate that it was composed before Catullus left Verona to live at Rome, and not during one of his brief visits to his old home. The motive is apparently as follows (see also later notes): The Door is that of a house in Verona (v. 34), formerly owned by an aged (v. 4) bachelor or widower (v. 6) named Balbus, after whose death (v. 6) it came into the possession of his son (v. 1) Caecilius, who thereupon married (v. 6) and brought home a young and lively widow (v. 20) from Brixia (v. 32), who claimed to be also a maid (v. 19). Strange rumors about her life soon
Cenomani (Italy) (search for this): text comm, poem 67
conscelerasse domum: cf. Catul. 64.404 divos scelerare parentes , also of unnatural crime. iners sterili semine: on the repetition of idea in the adjectives cf. Catul. 64.64, Catul. 64.103, Catul. 64.221; Catul. 90.5; and (with Ellis) v. 48. zonam: etc. cf. Catul. 2.13n. Brixia: the modern Brescia, the capital of the (Gallic) Cenomani (Liv. 32.30). It is about as far to the westward of Sirmio as Verona is to the eastward (one half-hour by rail). —The remainder of the verse is involved in great difficulty; it might naturally be taken to refer to the situation of Brixia at the base of a hill, but suppositum is apparently not used elsewhere in the sense of ‘lying at the foot of,’ and no hill in the neighborhood of Brixia is called by a <
divos scelerare parentes , also of unnatural crime. iners sterili semine: on the repetition of idea in the adjectives cf. Catul. 64.64, Catul. 64.103, Catul. 64.221; Catul. 90.5; and (with Ellis) v. 48. zonam: etc. cf. Catul. 2.13n. Brixia: the modern Brescia, the capital of the (Gallic) Cenomani (Liv. 32.30). It is about as far to the westward of Sirmio as Verona is to the eastward (one half-hour by rail). —The remainder of the verse is involved in great difficulty; it might naturally be taken to refer to the situation of Brixia at the base of a hill, but suppositum is apparently not used elsewhere in the sense of ‘lying at the foot of,’ and no hill in the neighborhood of Brixia is called by a name resembling chinea till about A.D. 1500, when this passage from C<
Roby (United Kingdom) (search for this): text comm, poem 67
7; Just. 20.5.8; not so, perhaps, Livy (Liv. 5.35.1), nor, certainly, Pliny (Plin. NH 3.130). The two men, evidently inhabitants of Brixia, are otherwise unknown. 37-40. A remark of the Door itself, which, having been fairly started on its story by v. 18, continues it to the end, preferring to anticipate rather than to await criticism. dixerit aliquis: see Roby (Lat. Gram. vol. 2. Pref.), who thinks the verb in this construction probably indicative. tigillo: the lintel, not the jamb, as suffixa sufficiently indicates. The ancient door, like some heavier specimens of modern make, swung on two vertical pivots fitting into sockets near the extremity of lintel and sill respectively. tollat supercilia: sc. in anger; cf. Schol. on
on married (v. 6) and brought home a young and lively widow (v. 20) from Brixia (v. 32), who claimed to be also a maid (v. 19). Strange rumors about her culpability is found not only in rumors that have followed her from Brixia, but in her own familiar talk with her maids in the presence of the Doorculty; it might naturally be taken to refer to the situation of Brixia at the base of a hill, but suppositum is apparently not used elsewhere the sense of ‘lying at the foot of,’ and no hill in the neighborhood of Brixia is called by a name resembling chinea till about A.D. 1500, whe curva prope flumina Mellae ) flows about a mile to the westward of Brixia. mater: Brixia is nowhere else called the mother-Brixia is nowhere else called the mother-city of Verona, though some writers speak of Verona as a Gallic town; cf. Ptol. 3.1.27; Just. 20.5.8; not so, perhaps, Livy (Liv. 5.35
seems to indicate that it was composed before Catullus left Verona to live at Rome, and not during one of his brief visits to hllows (see also later notes): The Door is that of a house in Verona (v. 34), formerly owned by an aged (v. 4) bachelor or widowe. Strange rumors about her life soon began to spread through Verona, and the poet inquires of the Door why it has betrayed its med its trust, but the woman was a bad lot before she came to Verona, and the current gossip is true of the period of her former 0). It is about as far to the westward of Sirmio as Verona is to the eastward (one half-hour by rail). —The re mater: Brixia is nowhere else called the mother-city of Verona, though some writers speak of Verona as a Gallic toVerona as a Gallic town; cf. Ptol. 3.1.27; Just. 20.5.8; not so, perhaps, Livy (Liv. 5.35.1), nor, certainly, Pliny (Plin. NH 3.13
ty; it might naturally be taken to refer to the situation of Brixia at the base of a hill, but suppositum is apparently not used elsewhere in the sense of ‘lying at the foot of,’ and no hill in the neighborhood of Brixia is called by a name resembling chinea till about A.D. 1500, when this passage from Catullus might have influenced local nomenclature (cf. the case of the Grampian Hills). praecurrit Mella: the Mella (cf. Verg. G. 4.278 curva prope flumina Mellae ) flows about a mile to the westward of Brixia. mater: Brixia is nowhere else called the mother-city of Verona, though some writers speak of Verona as a Gallic town; cf. Ptol. 3.1.27; Just. 20.5.8; not so, perhaps, Livy (Liv. 5.35.1), nor, certainly, Pliny (Plin. NH 3.130). The two men, evidently inha