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ition of vv. 20ff. of 68a in 68b (vv. 92ff.) shows that the two poems were not far separated in time, but is more consistent with the theory of division than of unity (see also heading 5). 68a was evidently written (at Verona or Sirmio) not long before 68b (see 5 above, and later notes), and both before Catullus had become thoroughly aware of Lesbia's real character, and had finally broken away from her. Perhaps her loose life duringeference to love-affairs in v. 26 leads Catullus to the second part of the letter of Manlius, wherein the writer, desiring the personal presence and sympathy of Catullus, and not knowing any reason for his long tarrying in Verona, endeavored to draw him thence by a warning (though using no names) that his duty to himself in the protection of his honor summoned him back to Rome; Catullus replies that his grief makes it impossible for even
i. e. love-poems; cf. Theog. 250 a)glaa\ mousa/wn dw=ra i)osterfa/nwn ; Anacr. 94b mouse/wn te kai\ a)glaa\ dw=r' *)afrodi/ths summi/sgwn e)rath=s mnh/sketai eu)frosu/nhs ff. Manlius, who apparently has not heard of the affliction of Catullus, had in the first part of his letter begged for consolatory verses from him, and in the second, urged his return to Rome, supporting his urgency by hints about the loose life of Lesbia during the unexplained absence of her lover. Catullus here and in vv. 33 ff. replies to the first part of the letter, and to the second part in vv. 27ff. Manli: the reading of V mali can readily stand for manli, as Catul. 61.16 mallio , and 61.222 maulio sufficiently show; and very tempting is the
is happy with her, and is disposed to condone her frailties (vv. 135ff.), while his grief is not ever-present, but is aroused only by a chance allusion to Troy, and is forthwith suppressed: §(6) the repetition of vv. 20ff. of 68a in 68b (vv. 92ff.) shows that the two poems were not far separated in time, but is more consistent with the theory of division than of unity (see also heading 5). 68a was evidently written (at Verona or Sirmio) not long before 68b (see 5 above, and later notes), and both before Catullus had become thoroughly aware of Lesbia's real character, and had finally broken away from her. Perhaps her loose life during this period of separation finally opened his eyes. For convenience of general reference the continuous numbering of verses is retained throughout 68a and 68b. quod: etc. the poetical epistle opens in pure prose form.
Ellis (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 68a
tion of the preceding phrase; for love-poems with Catullus were closely connected with love-experiences. dulcem amaritiem: cf. Sappho Frag. 40 gluku/pikron a)ma/xanon o)/rpeton (of love); Theog. 1353 pikro\s kai\ gluku/s e)sti … e)/rws ; Pl. Ps. 63 dulce amarumque una nunc misces mihi ; Goethe Egmont 3.2. freudvoll und leidvoll die Seele die liebt; Ellis quotes Romaunt of the Rose, p. 86 Bell For ever of love the siknesse Is meinde with swete and bitternesse. 19-28. Cf. Catul. 65.1ff; Catul. 68.92 ff.; Catul. 101.6. tecum: etc. not so much, perhaps, that the bachelor Catullus looked to his brother's prospective children to keep alive the family name, as that brotherly love led him to ascrihe to his brother a
of thanks for his services to Catullus in the affair with Lesbia, with which is incorporated an account of the poet's happiness entirely incongruous in 68a: §(5) in 68a the poet is so overcome with grief that he waives all reference to his relations with Lesbia (vv. 28, 29); in 68b he is happy with her, and is disposed to condone her frailties (vv. 135ff.), while his grief is not ever-present, but is aroused only by a chance allusion to Troy, and is forthwith suppressed: §(6) the repetition of vv. 20ff. of 68a in 68b (vv. 92ff.) shows that the two poems were not far separated in time, but is more consistent with the theory of division than of unity (see also heading 5). 68a was evidently written (at Verona or Sirmio) not long before 68b (see 5 above, and later notes), and both before Catullus had become thoroughly aware of Lesbia's real character, and had finally brok
Washington (United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 68a
f Catullus, and not knowing any reason for his long tarrying in Verona, endeavored to draw him thence by a warning (though using no names) that his duty to himself in the protection of his honor summoned him back to Rome; Catullus replies that his grief makes it impossible for even such considerations to move him. Veronae turpe Catullo esse: apparently the predicate infinitive esse is (though contrary to great argument for a direct quotation. hic: at the place where Manlius was writing, the word being quoted directly from his letter: there is no reason for believing the place to be other than Rome. quisquis: apparently the masculine is here used absolutely (without est) after analogy of established use of the neuter in that way. de meliore nota: of the better sort; c
impossible for even such considerations to move him. Veronae turpe Catullo esse: apparently the predicate infinitive esse is (though contrary to general usage) omitted here, or else (and most improbably) the later esse serves as both subject and predicate; for in spite of v. 28 hic and the MS. Catulle, a direct quotation in such a setting would be extremely rare. The meaning evidently is, ‘to be staying at Verona is dishonorable for Catullus, when his place with Lesbia is being filled by promiscuous lovers.’ The reply is ‘the matter is not one of dishonor but of sorrow.’ Catullo: the poet likes to refer to himself in the third person, and V not infrequently gives e for o; hence the MS. reading is no great argument for a direct quotation. hic: at the place where Manlius was writing, the word be