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century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was identified by the Greeks and Romans with Zeus and Jupiter; cf. Prop. 4.1.103 hoc neque harenosum Libyae Iovis explicat antrum. aestuosi: of glowing heat, as in Catul. 46.5 Nicaeae aestuosae; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.22.5 per Syrtes aestuosas ; Hor. Carm. 1.31.5 aes
Thebes (Greece) (search for this): text comm, poem 7
Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was identified by the Greeks and Romans with Zeus and Jupiter; cf. Prop. 4.1.103 hoc neque harenosum Libyae Iovis explicat antrum. aestuosi: of glowing heat, as in Catul. 46.5
yrenaica provincia repertum, cuius sucum laser vocant, magnificum in usu medicamentisque. The plant was doubtless the ferula asafoetida, the exuded juice of which is still widely used as an antispasmodic. It held a prominent place among the products and exports of Cyrenaica, and is represented upon coins of the country. Pliny notes, however, that in his time it had ceased to he produced there, and our supply comes from Persia and the East Indies. Cyrenis: Cyrenae (Gr. *kurh/nh) was the capital of the district of Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Ca
Cyrenaica (Libya) (search for this): text comm, poem 7
; Calp. Buc. 2.72 qui numerare velit … tenues citius numerabit harenas. laserpiciferis: cf. Plin. NH 19.38 laserpicium, quod Graeci si/lfion vocant, in Cyrenaica provincia repertum, cuius sucum laser vocant, magnificum in usu medicamentisque. The plant was doubtless the ferula asafoetida, the exuded juice of which is still widely used as an antispasmodic. It helr, that in his time it had ceased to he produced there, and our supply comes from Persia and the East Indies. Cyrenis: Cyrenae (Gr. *kurh/nh) was the capital of the district of Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great
East Indies (Indonesia) (search for this): text comm, poem 7
provincia repertum, cuius sucum laser vocant, magnificum in usu medicamentisque. The plant was doubtless the ferula asafoetida, the exuded juice of which is still widely used as an antispasmodic. It held a prominent place among the products and exports of Cyrenaica, and is represented upon coins of the country. Pliny notes, however, that in his time it had ceased to he produced there, and our supply comes from Persia and the East Indies. Cyrenis: Cyrenae (Gr. *kurh/nh) was the capital of the district of Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus.
btless the ferula asafoetida, the exuded juice of which is still widely used as an antispasmodic. It held a prominent place among the products and exports of Cyrenaica, and is represented upon coins of the country. Pliny notes, however, that in his time it had ceased to he produced there, and our supply comes from Persia and the East Indies. Cyrenis: Cyrenae (Gr. *kurh/nh) was the capital of the district of Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes
country. Pliny notes, however, that in his time it had ceased to he produced there, and our supply comes from Persia and the East Indies. Cyrenis: Cyrenae (Gr. *kurh/nh) was the capital of the district of Libya, called Cyrenaica, that bordered upon the Syrtis major. It was founded, according to tradition, about the middle of the seventh century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was ident
Jupiter (Florida, United States) (search for this): text comm, poem 7
trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was identified by the Greeks and Romans with Zeus and Jupiter; cf. Prop. 4.1.103 hoc neque harenosum Libyae Iovis explicat antrum. aestuosi: of glowing heat, as in Catul. 46.5 Nicaeae aestuosae; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.22.5 per Syrtes aestuosas ; Hor. Carm. 1.31.5 aestuosae Calabriae . Batti: see v. 4 n. Cyrenis. sacrum sepulcrum: the tomb of the founde
or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was identified by the Greeks and Romans with Zeus and Jupiter; cf. Prop. 4.1.103 hoc neque harenosum Libyae Iovis explicat antrum. aestuosi: of g per Syrtes aestuosas ; Hor. Carm. 1.31.5 aestuosae Calabriae . Batti: see v. 4 n. Cyrenis. sacrum sepulcrum: the tomb of the founder stood in the city of Cyrene, where he was reverenced as a god. tacet nox: with the rhythm cf. Catul. 5.5 n. tam: correlative with v. 3 quam. te: subject, not object of