hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Gades (Spain) 82 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 44 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 28 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 26 0 Browse Search
France (France) 24 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 24 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 22 0 Browse Search
Syria (Syria) 22 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 22 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 20 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Tullius Cicero, For Cornelius Balbus (ed. C. D. Yonge). Search the whole document.

Found 42 total hits in 9 results.

conduct, in doing what he had heard that Caius Marius had done; and what he had actually seen done in his own town by Publius Crassus, by Lucius Sulla, by Quintus Metellus; and, though last not least, what he had a family precedent for in his own father? Nor was Cornelius the only instance of his doing this. For he also presented Hasdrubal, of Saguntum, after that important war in Africa, and several of the MamertinesThere is probably corruption in both these names; especially in the latter. The Mamertines were a people of Sicily. who came across him, and some of the inhabitants of Utica, and the Fabii from Saguntum, with the freedom of the city. In truth, as those men are worthy of all other rewards too who defend our republic with their personal exertions and at the expense of their own
sly correct man, that most conscientious and modest man, Quintus Metellus Pius, give the freedom of the city to Quintus Fabius, of Saguntum? What? Did not this very man who is here in court, by whom all these cases, which I am now lightly running over, were all most carefully wrought up and set before you; did not Marcus Crassus give the freedom of the city to a man of Aletrium, which is a federate town,—Marcus Crassus, I say, a man not only eminent for wisdom and sobriety of conduct but also one who is usually even too sparing in admitting men as citizens of Rome? And do you now attempt to disparage Cnaeus Pompeius's kindness, or I should rather say, his discretion and conduct, in doing what he had heard that Caius M
What? Did not Cnaeus Pompeius, the father of this man, after he had performed mighty achievements in the Italian war, present Publius Caesius, a Roman knight and a virtuous man, who is still alive, a native of Ravenna, a city of a federate state, with the freedom of the city of Rome? What? did he not give the same gift also to two entire troops of the Camertines? What? Did not Publius Crassus, that most distinguished man, give the same gift to Alexas, the Heraclean, a man of that city with which there was a treaty, such as I may almost say there is no other instance of, made in the time of Pyrrhus, by Caius Fabricius, the consul? What? did not Sulla do the same to Aristo of Massilia? What? Since we are speaking
Marseilles (France) (search for this): text Balb., chapter 22
also to two entire troops of the Camertines? What? Did not Publius Crassus, that most distinguished man, give the same gift to Alexas, the Heraclean, a man of that city with which there was a treaty, such as I may almost say there is no other instance of, made in the time of Pyrrhus, by Caius Fabricius, the consul? What? did not Sulla do the same to Aristo of Massilia? What? Since we are speaking of the people of Gades, did not that same manThere is some great corruption in the text here. make nine men of the citizens of Gades, citizens of Rome at the same time? What? Did not that most scrupulously correct man, that most conscientious and modest man, Quintus Metellus Pius, give the freedom of the city to Quintus Fabius, of
t least, what he had a family precedent for in his own father? Nor was Cornelius the only instance of his doing this. For he also presented Hasdrubal, of Saguntum, after that important war in Africa, and several of the MamertinesThere is probably corruption in both these names; especially in the latter. The Mamertines were a people of Sicily. who came across him, and some of the inhabitants of Utica, and the Fabii from Saguntum, with the freedom of the city. In truth, as those men are worthy of all other rewards too who defend our republic with their personal exertions and at the expense of their own personal danger, so certainly those men are of all others the most worthy of being presented with the freedom of the city in defence of which they have encountered dangers and wounds. And
most conscientious and modest man, Quintus Metellus Pius, give the freedom of the city to Quintus Fabius, of Saguntum? What? Did not this very man who is here in court, by whom all these cases, which I am now lightly running over, precedent for in his own father? Nor was Cornelius the only instance of his doing this. For he also presented Hasdrubal, of Saguntum, after that important war in Africa, and several of the MamertinesThere is probably corruption in both these names; especially in the latter. The Mamertines were a people of Sicily. who came across him, and some of the inhabitants of Utica, and the Fabii from Saguntum, with the freedom of the city. In truth, as those men are worthy of all other rewards too who defend our republic with their personal exertion
s, by Lucius Sulla, by Quintus Metellus; and, though last not least, what he had a family precedent for in his own father? Nor was Cornelius the only instance of his doing this. For he also presented Hasdrubal, of Saguntum, after that important war in Africa, and several of the MamertinesThere is probably corruption in both these names; especially in the latter. The Mamertines were a people of Sicily. who came across him, and some of the inhabitants of Utica, and the Fabii from Saguntum, with the freedom of the city. In truth, as those men are worthy of all other rewards too who defend our republic with their personal exertions and at the expense of their own personal danger, so certainly those men are of all others the most worthy of being presented with the freedom of the city in defe
tance of, made in the time of Pyrrhus, by Caius Fabricius, the consul? What? did not Sulla do the same to Aristo of Massilia? What? Since we are speaking of the people of Gades, did not that same manThere is some great corruption in the text here. make nine men of the citizens of Gades, citizens of Rome at the same time? What? Did not that most Gades, citizens of Rome at the same time? What? Did not that most scrupulously correct man, that most conscientious and modest man, Quintus Metellus Pius, give the freedom of the city to Quintus Fabius, of Saguntum? What? Did not this very man who is here in court, by whom all these cases, which I am now lightly running over, were all most carefully wrought up and set before you; did not Marcus Crassus give the freedom of the city to a m
tuous man, who is still alive, a native of Ravenna, a city of a federate state, with the freedom of the city of Rome? What? did he not give the same gift also to two entire troops of the Camertines? What? Did not Publius Crassus, th did not that same manThere is some great corruption in the text here. make nine men of the citizens of Gades, citizens of Rome at the same time? What? Did not that most scrupulously correct man, that most conscientious and modest man, Quintusent for wisdom and sobriety of conduct but also one who is usually even too sparing in admitting men as citizens of Rome? And do you now attempt to disparage Cnaeus Pompeius's kindness, or I should rather say, his discretion and