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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 10 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 8 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, Iliad 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden). You can also browse the collection for Troy (Turkey) or search for Troy (Turkey) in all documents.

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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 3, line 613 (search)
‘From Ithaca, my native soil, I came To Troy; and Achaemenides my name. Me my poor father with Ulysses sent; (O had I stay'd, with poverty content!) But, fearful for themselves, my countrymen Left me forsaken in the Cyclops' den. The cave, tho' large, was dark; the dismal floor Was pav'd with mangled limbs and putrid gore. Our monstrous host, of more than human size, Erects his head, and stares within the skies; Bellowing his voice, and horrid is his hue. Ye gods, remove this plague from mortal view! The joints of slaughter'd wretches are his food; And for his wine he quaffs the streaming blood. These eyes beheld, when with his spacious hand He seiz'd two captives of our Grecian band; Stretch'd on his back, he dash'd against the stones Their broken bodies, and their crackling bones: With spouting blood the purple pavement swims, While the dire glutton grinds the trembling limbs. ‘Not unreveng'd Ulysses bore their fate, Nor thoughtless of his own unhappy state; For, gorg'd with flesh, a
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 4, line 1 (search)
Her sister first with early care she sought, And thus in mournful accents eas'd her thought: “My dearest Anna, what new dreams affright My lab'ring soul! what visions of the night Disturb my quiet, and distract my breast With strange ideas of our Trojan guest! His worth, his actions, and majestic air, A man descended from the gods declare. Fear ever argues a degenerate kind; His birth is well asserted by his mind. Then, what he suffer'd, when by Fate betray'd! What brave attempts for falling Troy he made! Such were his looks, so gracefully he spoke, That, were I not resolv'd against the yoke Of hapless marriage, never to be curst With second love, so fatal was my first, To this one error I might yield again; For, since Sichaeus was untimely slain, This only man is able to subvert The fix'd foundations of my stubborn heart. And, to confess my frailty, to my shame, Somewhat I find within, if not the same, Too like the sparkles of my former flame. But first let yawning earth a passage re
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 4, line 296 (search)
despairing queen Not worth preventing, tho' too well foreseen? Ev'n when the wintry winds command your stay, You dare the tempests, and defy the sea. False as you are, suppose you were not bound To lands unknown, and foreign coasts to sound; Were Troy restor'd, and Priam's happy reign, Now durst you tempt, for Troy, the raging main? See whom you fly! am I the foe you shun? Now, by those holy vows, so late begun, By this right hand, (since I have nothing more To challenge, but the faith you gaveTroy, the raging main? See whom you fly! am I the foe you shun? Now, by those holy vows, so late begun, By this right hand, (since I have nothing more To challenge, but the faith you gave before;) I beg you by these tears too truly shed, By the new pleasures of our nuptial bed; If ever Dido, when you most were kind, Were pleasing in your eyes, or touch'd your mind; By these my pray'rs, if pray'rs may yet have place, Pity the fortunes of a falling race. For you I have provok'd a tyrant's hate, Incens'd the Libyan and the Tyrian state; For you alone I suffer in my fame, Bereft of honor, and expos'd to shame. Whom have I now to trust, ungrateful guest? (That only name remains of al
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 4, line 416 (search)
near, My tender soul had been forewarn'd to bear. But do not you my last request deny; With yon perfidious man your int'rest try, And bring me news, if I must live or die. You are his fav'rite; you alone can find The dark recesses of his inmost mind: In all his trusted secrets you have part, And know the soft approaches to his heart. Haste then, and humbly seek my haughty foe; Tell him, I did not with the Grecians go, Nor did my fleet against his friends employ, Nor swore the ruin of unhappy Troy, Nor mov'd with hands profane his father's dust: Why should he then reject a just! Whom does he shun, and whither would he fly! Can he this last, this only pray'r deny! Let him at least his dang'rous flight delay, Wait better winds, and hope a calmer sea. The nuptials he disclaims I urge no more: Let him pursue the promis'd Latian shore. A short delay is all I ask him now; A pause of grief, an interval from woe, Till my soft soul be temper'd to sustain Accustom'd sorrows, and inur'd to pain.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 183 (search)
To reach the mark. Sergesthus takes the place; Mnestheus pursues; and while around they wind, Comes up, not half his galley's length behind; Then, on the deck, amidst his mates appear'd, And thus their drooping courage he cheer'd: “My friends, and Hector's followers heretofore, Exert your vigor; tug the lab'ring oar; Stretch to your strokes, my still unconquer'd crew, Whom from the flaming walls of Troy I drew. In this, our common int'rest, let me find That strength of hand, that courage of the mind, As when you stemm'd the strong Malean flood, And o'er the Syrtes' broken billows row'd. I seek not now the foremost palm to gain; Tho' yeT'mdash;but, ah! that haughty wish is vain! Let those enjoy it whom the gods ordain. But to be last, the lags of all the race!—/L> Redeem yourselves and me from that disgrace.” Now, one and all, they tug amain; they row At the full stretch, and shake the brazen prow. The sea beneath 'em sinks; their lab'ring sides Are swell'd, and sweat runs gutt'ring dow<
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 545 (search)
ching on in military pride, Shouts of applause resound from side to side. Their casques adorn'd with laurel wreaths they wear, Each brandishing aloft a cornel spear. Some at their backs their gilded quivers bore; Their chains of burnish'd gold hung down before. Three graceful troops they form'd upon the green; Three graceful leaders at their head were seen; Twelve follow'd ev'ry chief, and left a space between. The first young Priam led; a lovely boy, Whose grandsire was th' unhappy king of Troy; His race in after times was known to fame, New honors adding to the Latian name; And well the royal boy his Thracian steed became. White were the fetlocks of his feet before, And on his front a snowy star he bore. Then beauteous Atys, with Iulus bred, Of equal age, the second squadron led. The last in order, but the first in place, First in the lovely features of his face, Rode fair Ascanius on a fiery steed, Queen Dido's gift, and of the Tyrian breed. Sure coursers for the rest the king ord
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 575 (search)
They meet; they wheel; they throw their darts afar With harmless rage and well-dissembled war. Then in a round the mingled bodies run: Flying they follow, and pursuing shun; Broken, they break; and, rallying, they renew In other forms the military shew. At last, in order, undiscern'd they join, And march together in a friendly line. And, as the Cretan labyrinth of old, With wand'ring ways and many a winding fold, Involv'd the weary feet, without redress, In a round error, which denied recess; So fought the Trojan boys in warlike play, Turn'd and return'd, and still a diff'rent way. Thus dolphins in the deep each other chase In circles, when they swim around the wat'ry race. This game, these carousels, Ascanius taught; And, building Alba, to the Latins brought; Shew'd what he learn'd: the Latin sires impart To their succeeding sons the graceful art; From these imperial Rome receiv'd the game, Which Troy, the youths the Trojan troop, they name. Thus far the sacred sports they celebrate.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 623 (search)
“O wretched we, whom not the Grecian pow'r, Nor flames, destroy'd, in Troy's unhappy hour! O wretched we, reserv'd by cruel fate, Beyond the ruins of the sinking state! Now sev'n revolving years are wholly run, Since this improsp'rous voyage we begun; Since, toss'd from shores to shores, from lands to lands, Inhospitable rocks and barren sands, Wand'ring in exile thro' the stormy sea, We search in vain for flying Italy. Now cast by fortune on this kindred land, What should our rest and rising way fleet consume! Cassandra bids; and I declare her doom. In sleep I saw her; she supplied my hands (For this I more than dreamt) with flaming brands: ‘With these,’ said she, ‘these wand'ring ships destroy: These are your fatal seats, and this your Troy.’ Time calls you now; the precious hour employ: Slack not the good presage, while Heav'n inspires Our minds to dare, and gives the ready fires. See! Neptune's altars minister their brands: The god is pleas'd; the god supplies our hands.” Then
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 664 (search)
e first the news to bear, While yet they crowd the rural theater. Then, what they hear, is witness'd by their eyes: A storm of sparkles and of flames arise. Ascanius took th' alarm, while yet he led His early warriors on his prancing steed, And, spurring on, his equals soon o'erpass'd; Nor could his frighted friends reclaim his haste. Soon as the royal youth appear'd in view, He sent his voice before him as he flew: “What madness moves you, matrons, to destroy The last remainders of unhappy Troy! Not hostile fleets, but your own hopes, you burn, And on your friends your fatal fury turn. Behold your own Ascanius!” While he said, He drew his glitt'ring helmet from his head, In which the youths to sportful arms he led. By this, Aeneas and his train appear; And now the women, seiz'd with shame and fear, Dispers'd, to woods and caverns take their flight, Abhor their actions, and avoid the light; Their friends acknowledge, and their error find, And shake the goddess from their alter'd mind
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 5, line 746 (search)
name, Who dares not hazard life for future fame. These they cashier: the brave remaining few, Oars, banks, and cables, half consum'd, renew. The prince designs a city with the plow; The lots their sev'ral tenements allow. This part is nam'd from Ilium, that from Troy, And the new king ascends the throne with joy; A chosen senate from the people draws; Appoints the judges, and ordains the laws. Then, on the top of Eryx, they begin A rising temple to the Paphian queen. Anchises, last, is honor'ds, banks, and cables, half consum'd, renew. The prince designs a city with the plow; The lots their sev'ral tenements allow. This part is nam'd from Ilium, that from Troy, And the new king ascends the throne with joy; A chosen senate from the people draws; Appoints the judges, and ordains the laws. Then, on the top of Eryx, they begin A rising temple to the Paphian queen. Anchises, last, is honor'd as a god; A priest is added, annual gifts bestow'd, And groves are planted round his blest abode.
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