hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Troy (Turkey) 332 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 138 0 Browse Search
Latium (Italy) 76 0 Browse Search
Tiber (Italy) 54 0 Browse Search
Rome (Italy) 38 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 28 0 Browse Search
Argive (Greece) 24 0 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 22 0 Browse Search
Mycenae (Greece) 22 0 Browse Search
Eryx (Italy) 20 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). Search the whole document.

Found 6 total hits in 2 results.

llen, clutch the sword. If hope ye cherished of Aetolia's power, dismiss it! For what hope ye have is found in your own bosoms only. But ye know how slight it is and small. What ruin wide has fallen, is now palpable and clear. No blame I cast. What valor's uttermost may do was done; our kingdom in this war strained its last thews. Now therefore I will tell such project as my doubtful mind may frame, and briefly, if ye give good heed, unfold: an ancient tract have I, close-bordering the river Tiber; it runs westward far beyond Sicania's bound, and filth it bears to Rutule and Auruncan husbandmen, who furrow its hard hills or feed their flocks along the stonier slopes. Let this demesne, together with its pine-clad mountain tall, be given the Teucrian for our pledge of peace, confirmed by free and equitable league, and full alliance with our kingly power. Let them abide there, if it please them so, and build their city's wall. But if their hearts for other land or people yearn, and fate
Aetolia (Greece) (search for this): book 11, card 302
“Less evil were our case, if long ago ye had provided for your country's weal, O Latins, as I urged. It is no time to hold dispute, while, compassing our walls, the foeman waits. Ill-omened war is ours against a race of gods, my countrymen, invincible, unwearied in the fray, and who, though lost and fallen, clutch the sword. If hope ye cherished of Aetolia's power, dismiss it! For what hope ye have is found in your own bosoms only. But ye know how slight it is and small. What ruin wide has fallen, is now palpable and clear. No blame I cast. What valor's uttermost may do was done; our kingdom in this war strained its last thews. Now therefore I will tell such project as my doubtful mind may frame, and briefly, if ye give good heed, unfold: an ancient tract have I, close-bordering the river Tiber; it runs westward far beyond Sicania's bound, and filth it bears to Rutule and Auruncan husbandmen, who furrow its hard hills or feed their flocks along the stonier slopes. Let this demesne, t