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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various).

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Sabine (United States) (search for this): poem 12
t sunk the pride of Troy; The Centaurs double form'd, half man, half beast, Defil'd with horrid war the nuptial feast; Inflam'd by wine and woman's magic charms, They turn'd the jolly face of joy to arms. 'Twas woman urg'd the strife; a second fair Involv'd the Trojans in a second war. What wreck, what ruin, did a Woman bring On peaceful Latium, and its pious king! When Rome was young and in her infant state What woes did woman to our sires create! Into what peril was that city brought, When Sabine fathers for their daughters fought ! Two lusty bulls I in the meads have view'd In combat join'd, and by their side there stood A milk-white heifer, who provok'd the fight, By each contended, but the conqueror's right; She gives them courage, her they both regard, As one that caus'd the war, and must reward. Compell'd by Cupid in his host to list (And who that has a heart can love resist ?) His soldier I have been, without the guilt Of blood, in any of our battles spilt; For him I've fought,
h, the walls of Troy; What glory was there by th' Atrides won, So many chiefs before a single town! Not thus did I my pleasant toils pursue, And the whole glory to myself is due; Myself was horse and foot, myself alone The captain and the soldier was in one, And fought beneath no banner but my own. Whether by strength I combated, or wile, Fortune did ever on my actions smile; I only owe my triumph to my care, And by my patience only won the fair. Nor was my cause of quarrel new; the same Set Europe and proud Asia in a flame. For Helen, ravish'd by the Dardan boy, Was the war wag'd that sunk the pride of Troy; The Centaurs double form'd, half man, half beast, Defil'd with horrid war the nuptial feast; Inflam'd by wine and woman's magic charms, They turn'd the jolly face of joy to arms. 'Twas woman urg'd the strife; a second fair Involv'd the Trojans in a second war. What wreck, what ruin, did a Woman bring On peaceful Latium, and its pious king! When Rome was young and in her infant sta
Corinna (Maine, United States) (search for this): poem 12
Elegy XII: The Poet rejoices for the favours he has received of his mistress. Io Triumphe! I have won the prize, For in my arms the fair Corinna lies. Nor jealous husband, nor a guardian's care, Nor door defended with a double bar, Could fence against a lover's artifice, For in my arms the fair Corinna lies. With reason of my victory I boast, The conquest gain'd, and yet no blood is lost; I scal'd no walls, I pass'd no ditch profound, Safe were my wars, and all without a wound. My only work aCorinna lies. With reason of my victory I boast, The conquest gain'd, and yet no blood is lost; I scal'd no walls, I pass'd no ditch profound, Safe were my wars, and all without a wound. My only work a charming girl to gain; The pleasure well rewards the little pain. Ten years the Greeks did in one siege employ, But levell'd were, at length, the walls of Troy; What glory was there by th' Atrides won, So many chiefs before a single town! Not thus did I my pleasant toils pursue, And the whole glory to myself is due; Myself was horse and foot, myself alone The captain and the soldier was in one, And fought beneath no banner but my own. Whether by strength I combated, or wile, Fortune did ever o
Asia (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): poem 12
Troy; What glory was there by th' Atrides won, So many chiefs before a single town! Not thus did I my pleasant toils pursue, And the whole glory to myself is due; Myself was horse and foot, myself alone The captain and the soldier was in one, And fought beneath no banner but my own. Whether by strength I combated, or wile, Fortune did ever on my actions smile; I only owe my triumph to my care, And by my patience only won the fair. Nor was my cause of quarrel new; the same Set Europe and proud Asia in a flame. For Helen, ravish'd by the Dardan boy, Was the war wag'd that sunk the pride of Troy; The Centaurs double form'd, half man, half beast, Defil'd with horrid war the nuptial feast; Inflam'd by wine and woman's magic charms, They turn'd the jolly face of joy to arms. 'Twas woman urg'd the strife; a second fair Involv'd the Trojans in a second war. What wreck, what ruin, did a Woman bring On peaceful Latium, and its pious king! When Rome was young and in her infant state What woes did
Memphis (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): poem 13
acquaint with what she did, From me a thing, which I abhorr'd, she hid; Well might I now be angry, but I fear, Ill as she is, I might endanger her. By me, I must confess, she did conceive, The fact is so, or else I so believe; We've cause to think, what may so likely be, So is, and then the babe belongs to me Oh Isis, who delight'st to haunt the fields, Where fruitful Nile his golden harvest yields, Where with seven mouths into the sea it falls, And hast thy walks around Canope's walls, Who Memphis visit'st, and the Pharian tower, Assist Corinna with thy friendly powers. Thee by thy silver Sistra I conjure, A life so precious by thy aid secure; So mayst thou with Osiris still find grace: By Anubis's venerable face, I pray thee, so may still thy rights divine Flourish, and serpents round thy offerings twine May Apis with his horns the pomp attend, And be to thee, as thou'rt to her, a friend. Look down, oh Isis! on the teeming fair, And make at once her life and mine thy care: Have pit
of our repeated joy. While on herself she practises her skill, She's like the mother, not the child, to kill. Me she would not acquaint with what she did, From me a thing, which I abhorr'd, she hid; Well might I now be angry, but I fear, Ill as she is, I might endanger her. By me, I must confess, she did conceive, The fact is so, or else I so believe; We've cause to think, what may so likely be, So is, and then the babe belongs to me Oh Isis, who delight'st to haunt the fields, Where fruitful Nile his golden harvest yields, Where with seven mouths into the sea it falls, And hast thy walks around Canope's walls, Who Memphis visit'st, and the Pharian tower, Assist Corinna with thy friendly powers. Thee by thy silver Sistra I conjure, A life so precious by thy aid secure; So mayst thou with Osiris still find grace: By Anubis's venerable face, I pray thee, so may still thy rights divine Flourish, and serpents round thy offerings twine May Apis with his horns the pomp attend, And be to thee
Corinna (Maine, United States) (search for this): poem 13
Elegy XIII: To Isis. A prayer that the goddess would assist Corinna, and prevent her miscarrying. With cruel art Corinna would destroy The ripening fruit of our reCorinna would destroy The ripening fruit of our repeated joy. While on herself she practises her skill, She's like the mother, not the child, to kill. Me she would not acquaint with what she did, From me a thing, whlks around Canope's walls, Who Memphis visit'st, and the Pharian tower, Assist Corinna with thy friendly powers. Thee by thy silver Sistra I conjure, A life so preciee thy votaries pray For speedy help, thy wanted help delay. Lucina, listen to Corinna's pray'r; Thy votary she, and worthy of thy care. I'll with my off'rings to th bless, In words inscrib'd, I'll on thy shrine express:- "Ovid, the servant of Corinna, pray'd The goddess here, the teeming dame to aid." Ah, goddess! of my humble my vow. If frighted as I am, I may presume Your conduct to direct in time to come, Corinna, since you've suffer'd thus before, Ah, try the bold experiment no more!
Osiris (Missouri, United States) (search for this): poem 13
did conceive, The fact is so, or else I so believe; We've cause to think, what may so likely be, So is, and then the babe belongs to me Oh Isis, who delight'st to haunt the fields, Where fruitful Nile his golden harvest yields, Where with seven mouths into the sea it falls, And hast thy walks around Canope's walls, Who Memphis visit'st, and the Pharian tower, Assist Corinna with thy friendly powers. Thee by thy silver Sistra I conjure, A life so precious by thy aid secure; So mayst thou with Osiris still find grace: By Anubis's venerable face, I pray thee, so may still thy rights divine Flourish, and serpents round thy offerings twine May Apis with his horns the pomp attend, And be to thee, as thou'rt to her, a friend. Look down, oh Isis! on the teeming fair, And make at once her life and mine thy care: Have pity on her pains; the help you give To her, her lover saves, in her I live. From thee this favour she deserves; she pays Her vows to thee on all thy solemn days; And when the Gal
Ovid (New York, United States) (search for this): poem 13
ve pity on her pains; the help you give To her, her lover saves, in her I live. From thee this favour she deserves; she pays Her vows to thee on all thy solemn days; And when the Galli at thy altars wait, She's present at the feast they celebrate. And thou, Lucina, who the labouring womb Dost with compassion view, to her assistance come: Nor dost thou, when to thee thy votaries pray For speedy help, thy wanted help delay. Lucina, listen to Corinna's pray'r; Thy votary she, and worthy of thy care. I'll with my off'rings to thy altar come, With votive myrrh thy sacred fane perfume; The vows I make that thou my fair mayst bless, In words inscrib'd, I'll on thy shrine express:- "Ovid, the servant of Corinna, pray'd The goddess here, the teeming dame to aid." Ah, goddess! of my humble suit allow; Give place to my inscription and my vow. If frighted as I am, I may presume Your conduct to direct in time to come, Corinna, since you've suffer'd thus before, Ah, try the bold experiment no more!
Washington (United States) (search for this): poem 14
his wicked trade, Among the race of men what havock had they made. Mankind had been extinct, and lost the seed, Without a wonder to restore the breed, As when Deucalion and his Purrha hurl'd The stones that sow'd with men the delug'd world, Had Thetis, goddess of the sea, refus'd To bear the burden, and her fruit abus'd, Who would have Priam's royal seat destroy'd? Or had the vestal whom fierce Mars enjoy'd, Stifled the twins within her pergnant womb, What founder would have then been born to Rome? Had Venus, when she with Aeneas teem'd, To death, ere born, Anchises' son condemn'd, The world had of the Caesars been depriv'd; Augustus ne'er had reign'd, nor Julius liv'd. And thou, whose beauty is the boast of fame, Hadst perish'd, had thy mother done the same; Nor had I liv'd love's faithful slave to be, Had my own mother dealt as ill by me. Ah, vile invention, ah, accurs'd design, To rob of rip'ning fruit the loaded vine Ah, let it grow for nature's use mature, Ah, let it its full leng
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