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ll nie both twaine conveyed were. The name of him was Pyramus, and Thisbe calde was she. So faire a man in all the East was none alive as he,s verie light and safely to and fro. Now as at one side Pyramus and Thisbe on the tother Stoode often drawing one of them the pleasant breath om thence doth rise. As soone as darkenesse once was come, straight Thisbe did devise A shift to wind hir out of doores, that none that were wstaunch hir bloudie thurst With water of the foresaid spring. Whome Thisbe spying furst, Afarre by moonelight, thereupon with fearfull steppesut Cowardes use to wish for death. The slender weede that fell From Thisbe up he takes, and streight doth beare it to the tree, Which was appoeare with which she was agast, For doubt of disapointing him commes Thisbe forth in hast, And for hir lover lookes about, rejoycing for to tely ripe, the Berrie is bespect With colour tending to a blacke. And that which after fire Remained, rested in one Tumbe as Thisbe did desire.
Pyramus (Turkey) (search for this): book 4, card 55
her secretly, and through the same did goe Their loving whisprings verie light and safely to and fro. Now as at one side Pyramus and Thisbe on the tother Stoode often drawing one of them the pleasant breath from other: O thou envious wall (they say weede that fell From Thisbe, which with bloudie teeth in pieces she did teare. The night was somewhat further spent ere Pyramus came there Who seeing in the suttle sande the print of Lions paw, Waxt pale for feare. But when also the bloudie cloks bloud, and kissing all his face (Which now became as colde as yse) she cride in wofull case: Alas what chaunce, my Pyramus, hath parted thee and mee? Make aunswere O my Pyramus: it is thy Thisb', even shee Whome thou doste love most heartely, Pyramus: it is thy Thisb', even shee Whome thou doste love most heartely, that speaketh unto thee. Give eare and rayse thy heavie heade. He hearing Thisbes name, Lift up his dying eyes and having seene hir closde the same. But when she knew hir mantle there and saw his scabberd lie Without the swoorde: Unhappy man thy l