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ment, to take away all occasion of discord; because Caesar had reason to fear, as two of his legions had been taken from him, that Pompey retained them in the neighbourhood of Rome, with a view to employ them against him." M. Rufus nearly agreed with Callidius. But they were all severely reprimanded by the consul Lentulus, who expressly refused to put Callidius's motion to the vote. Marcellus, awed by the consul's reprimand, retracted what he had said. Thus the clamours of Lentulus, the dread of an army at the gates of Rome, and the menaces of Pompey's friends, forced the greater part of the senate, though with the utmost reluctance and dislike, into a compliance with Scipio's motion: " That Caesar should be ordered to disband
This speech of Scipio, as the senate was held in the city, and Pompey resided in the suburbs, was considered as coming from Pompey's own mouth. Some were for following milder counsels, of which number was M. Marcellus, who gave it as his opinion: "That it was not proper to enter upon the present deliberation, till troops were raised over all Italy, and an army got ready, under whose protection the senate might proceed with freedom and safety in their debates." " Callidius was for sending Pompey to his government, to take away all occasion of discord; because Caesar had reason to fear, as two of his legions had been taken from him, that Pompey retained them in the neighbourhood of Rome, with a view to employ them against him." M. Rufus nearly