hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julian (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Nero (Ohio, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Julian (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Vestal (New York, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Julian (West Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Arcadian (Michigan, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Germans (Pennsylvania, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Sibyl (Iowa, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
The Cave (Alabama, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
Old Camp (Nevada, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb). Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 1 results.

Arcadian (Michigan, United States) (search for this): book 11, chapter 14
eir superior seamanship, introduced into Greece, and of which they appropriated the glory, giving out that they had discovered what they had really been taught. Tradition indeed says that Cadmus, visiting Greece in a Phœnician fleet, was the teacher of this art to its yet barbarous tribes. According to one account, it was Cecrops of Athens or Linus of Thebes, or Palamedes of Argos in Trojan times who invented the shapes of sixteen letters, and others, chiefly Simonides, added the rest. In Italy the Etrurians learnt them from Demaratus of Corinth, and the Aborigines from the Arcadian Evander. And so the Latin letters have the same form as the oldest Greek characters. At first too our alphabet was scanty, and additions were afterwards made. Following this precedent Claudius added three letters, which were employed during his reign and subsequently disused. These may still be seen on the tablets of brass set up in the squares and temples, on which new statutes are published