hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Julian (Pennsylvania, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Nero (Ohio, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Julian (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Vestal (New York, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Julian (West Virginia, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Arcadian (Michigan, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Germans (Pennsylvania, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
Sibyl (Iowa, United States) 4 0 Browse Search
The Cave (Alabama, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
Old Camp (Nevada, United States) 2 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Cornelius Tacitus, The Annals (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb). Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 1 results.

Nero (Ohio, United States) (search for this): book 12, chapter 24
There are various popular accounts of the ambitious and vainglorious efforts of our kings in this matter. Still, I think, it is interesting to know accurately the original plan of the precinct, as it was fixed by Romulus. From the ox market, where we see the brazen statue of a bull, because CLAUDIUS ADOPTS DOMITIUS (NERO) that animal is yoked to the plough, a furrow was drawn to mark out the town, so as to embrace the great altar of Hercules; then, at regular intervals, stones were placed along the foot of the Palatine hill to the altar of Consus, soon afterwards, to the old Courts, and then to the chapel of Larunda. The Roman forum and the Capitol were not, it was supposed, added to the city by Romulus, but by Titus Tatius. In time, the precinct was enlarged with the growth of Rome's fortunes. The boundaries now fixed by Claudius may be easily recognized, as they are specified in the public record