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Browsing named entities in a specific section of T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). Search the whole document.

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Lesbos (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 6
Let her come spontaneously, seek you, court you, strive to win you. Unless you wish to lose that glory which you have, please have a care what you do. For I know that this was never the lot of any mortal, except two persons, yourself and Phaon of LesbosPhaon of Lesbos: Sappho, the poetess, was enamoured of Phaon the Lesbian. When he deserted her, she threw herself from the Leucadian promontory or Lover's Leap, which was supposed to provide a cure for unrequited love. Her death was the consequenLesbos: Sappho, the poetess, was enamoured of Phaon the Lesbian. When he deserted her, she threw herself from the Leucadian promontory or Lover's Leap, which was supposed to provide a cure for unrequited love. Her death was the consequence. See her Epistle to Phaon, the twenty-first of the Heroides of Ovid., to be loved so desperately. ACROTELEUTIUM aloud. I'll go in-doorsI'll go indoors: It must be remembered, that all this time they have pretended not to see Palaestrio or his master. Milphidippa cautioned her mistress only to take a side-glance at him (limis), after which they have, probably turned their backs.--or, my dear Milphidippa, do you call him out of doors. MILPHIDIPPA aloud. Aye; let's wait until some one comes ou