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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley).

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Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
ce from me," and TRACHALIO moves farther off as he delivers the next line.. TEACH. But now he is against you; from this pointing to the wallet will he obtain true testimony. DÆM. Gripus, do you pay attention. To TRACHALIO. You explain in a few words what it is you want? TRACHALIO For my part, I have stated it; but if you haven't understood me, I'll state it over again. Both of these women pointing to them, as I said a short time since, ought to be free; pointing to PALÆSTRA she was stolen at Athens when a little girl. GRIPUS Tell me what that has got to do with the wallet, whether they are slaves or whether free women? TRACHALIO You wish it all to be told over again, you rascal, so that the day may fail us. DÆM. Leave off your abuse, and explain to me what I've been asking. TRACHALIO There ought to be a casket of wicker-workCasket of wicker-work: "Caudeam." Festus tells us that this kind of casket was made of wicker, and received its name from its resemblance to a horse's tail, "cauda
Athens (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
r abuse, and explain to me what I've been asking. TRACHALIO There ought to be a casket of wicker-workCasket of wicker-work: "Caudeam." Festus tells us that this kind of casket was made of wicker, and received its name from its resemblance to a horse's tail, "cauda;" others, however, perhaps with more probability, derive it from "caudex," "a piece of wood." in that wallet, in which are tokens by means of which she may be enabled to recognize her parents, by whom, when little, she was lost at Athens, as I said before. GRIPUS May Jupiter and the Gods confound you. What do you say, you sorcerer of a fellow? What, are these women dumb, that they are not able to speak for themselves? TRACHALIO They are silent for this reason, because a silent woman is always better than a talking one. GRIPUS Then, i' faith, by your way of speaking, you are neither a man nor a woman to my notion. TRACHALIO How so? GRIPUS Why, because neither talking nor silent are you ever good for anything. Prithee to DÆM
Jupiter (Canada) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
een asking. TRACHALIO There ought to be a casket of wicker-workCasket of wicker-work: "Caudeam." Festus tells us that this kind of casket was made of wicker, and received its name from its resemblance to a horse's tail, "cauda;" others, however, perhaps with more probability, derive it from "caudex," "a piece of wood." in that wallet, in which are tokens by means of which she may be enabled to recognize her parents, by whom, when little, she was lost at Athens, as I said before. GRIPUS May Jupiter and the Gods confound you. What do you say, you sorcerer of a fellow? What, are these women dumb, that they are not able to speak for themselves? TRACHALIO They are silent for this reason, because a silent woman is always better than a talking one. GRIPUS Then, i' faith, by your way of speaking, you are neither a man nor a woman to my notion. TRACHALIO How so? GRIPUS Why, because neither talking nor silent are you ever good for anything. Prithee to DÆMONES, shall I ever be allowed to-day
Venus (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): act 4, scene 4
GRIPUS If indeed you were a decent person, you would be moving yourself off from here. DÆM. Gripus, give attention, and hold your tongue GRIPUS In order that that fellow may speak first? DÆM. Attend, Itell you. To TRACHALIO. Do you say on. GRIPUS Will you give the right of speaking to a stranger sooner than to your own servant? TRACHALIO O dear! how impossible it is for him to be kept quiet. As I was beginning to say, that Procurer, whom some little time since you turned out of the Temple of Venus--see pointing at the wallet, he has got his wallet. GRIPUS I haven't got it. TRACHALIO Do you deny that which I see with my own eyes? GRIPUS But I only wish you couldn't see. I have got it, and I haven't got it; why do you trouble yourself about me, what things I do? TRACHALIO In what way you got it does matter, whether rightfully or wrongfully. GRIPUS If I didn't take it in the sea, there's not a reason why you shouldn't deliver me up to the cross. If I took it in the sea with my net, how
Thales (Indiana, United States) (search for this): act 4, scene 3
to-day! TRACHALIO We are wasting words; the day wears apace. Consider, please, by whose arbitration do you wish us to proceed? GRIPUS By the arbitration of the wallet. TRACHALIO Really so, indeed? You are a fool. GRIPUS My respects to you, Mister ThalesThales: Thales of Miletus was one of the seven wise men of Greece. Gripus ironically calls Trachalio by this name, in reply to the other having called him a fool. Going. TRACHALIO holding him. You shan't carry that off this day, unless you find Thales: Thales of Miletus was one of the seven wise men of Greece. Gripus ironically calls Trachalio by this name, in reply to the other having called him a fool. Going. TRACHALIO holding him. You shan't carry that off this day, unless you find a place of safe keeping for it, or an umpire, by whose arbitration this matter may be settled. GRIPUS Prithee, are you in your senses? TRACHALIO I'm mad, in need of hellebore. GRIPUS But I'm troubled with sprites; still I shan't let this go. Hugs the wallet. TRACHALIO Only add a single word more, that instant I'll drive my fists smash into your brains. This instant on this spot, just as a new napkin is wont to be wrung, I'll wring out of you whatever moisture there is, if you don't let this go.
Hallo (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): act 4, scene 3
Enter TRACHALIO, in haste. TRACHALIO Hallo there! stop. GRIPUS Why should I stop? TRACHALIO While I coil up this ropeThis rope: This is the first mention of the "rudens," or "netrope," from which the Play derives its name. for you that you are dragging. GRIPUS Now let it alone. TRACHALIO Troth, but I'll assist you. What's kindly done to worthy men, isn't thrown away. GRIPUS * * * * * There was a boisterous tempest yesterday; no fish have I, young man; don't you be supposing I have. Don't you see that I'm carrying my dripping net without the scaly race? TRACHALIO I' faith, I'm not wishing for fish so much as I am in need of your conversation. GRIPUS Then, whoever you are, you are worrying me to death with your annoyance. TRACHALIO takes hold of him. I'll not allow you to go away from here; stop. GRIPUS Take you care of a mishap, if you please; but why the plague are you dragging me back? TRACHALIO Listen. GRIPUS I won't listen. TRACHALIO But, upon my faith, you shall listen. GRI
Miletus (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): act 4, scene 3
es also. TRACHALIO I understand; by my troth, you'll be turning into a wallet-fish I fancy, if you don't take care; your skin will be purple, and then afterwards black. GRIPUS aside. What a villain this that I have met with to-day! TRACHALIO We are wasting words; the day wears apace. Consider, please, by whose arbitration do you wish us to proceed? GRIPUS By the arbitration of the wallet. TRACHALIO Really so, indeed? You are a fool. GRIPUS My respects to you, Mister ThalesThales: Thales of Miletus was one of the seven wise men of Greece. Gripus ironically calls Trachalio by this name, in reply to the other having called him a fool. Going. TRACHALIO holding him. You shan't carry that off this day, unless you find a place of safe keeping for it, or an umpire, by whose arbitration this matter may be settled. GRIPUS Prithee, are you in your senses? TRACHALIO I'm mad, in need of hellebore. GRIPUS But I'm troubled with sprites; still I shan't let this go. Hugs the wallet. TRACHALIO Only a
Macedon (Greece) (search for this): act 4, scene 2
romise money for my freedom, that I may be free. Now, when I shall be free, then, in fine, I'll provide me land and housesLand and houses: Is not this wonderfully like Alnaschar's reverie in the Arabian Nights, so aptly quoted in the Spectator? and slaves: I'll carry on merchandize with large ships: among the grandees I shall be considered a grandee. Afterwards, for the sake of pleasing myself, I'll build me a ship and I'll imitate StratonicusStratonicus: He was the treasurer of Philip of Macedon and Alexander the Great, and was famed for his wealth among the Greeks, as Crassus was among the Romans., and I'll be carried about from town to town. When my greatness is far-spread, I shall fortify some great city: to that city I shall give the name of "Gripus," a memorial of my fame and exploits, and there I'll establish a mighty kingdom. I am resolving here in my mind to prepare for mighty matters. At present I'll hide this booty. But this grandee pointing to himself is about to breakfa
Neptune (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): act 4, scene 2
Enter GRIPUS, dragging a net enclosing a wallet, by a rope. GRIPUS to himself. These thanks do I return to Neptune, my patron, who dwells in the salt retreats, the abode of fishes, inasmuch as he has despatched me finely laden on my return from his retreats, and from his Temples, laden with most abundant booty, with safety to my boat, which in the stormy sea made me master of a singular and rich haul. In a wondrous and incredible manner has this haul turned out prosperously for me, nor yet have I this day taken a single ounce weight of fish, but only that which I am here bringing with me in my net. For when I arose in the middle of the night, and without sloth, I preferred profit to sleep and rest; in the raging tempest, I determined to try how I might lighten the poverty of my master and my own servitude, not sparing of my own exertions. Most worthless is the man that is slothful, and most detestably do I hate that kind of men. It behoves him to be vigilant who wishes to do his dut
Venus (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): act 3, scene 6
TRACHALIO, at a distance, on the other side of the stage. PLESIDIPPUS And did the Procurer attempt by force and violence to drag my mistress away from the altar of Venus? TRACHALIO Even so. PLESIDIPPUS Why didn't you kill him on the instant? TRACHALIO I hadn't a sword. PLESIDIPPUS You should have taken either a stick or a stone. now they are sitting in the same place. PLESIDIPPUS Who is now protecting them there? TRACHALIO Some old gentleman, I don't know who, a neighbour of the Temple of Venus--he gave very kind assistance; he is now protecting them with his servants--I committed them to his charge. PLESIDIPPUS Lead me straight to the Procurer. Where is on board ship," for the purpose of being carried away. unfortunately, I couldn't. For my part, I told you that this day I would make my appearance at the Temple of Venus; have I swerved at all from that? Am I not there? PLESIDIPPUS Plead your cause in the court of justice; here a word is enough. Follow me. They lay hold of him. LAB
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