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Browsing named entities in a specific section of T. Maccius Plautus, Trinummus: The Three Pieces of Money (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). Search the whole document.

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atter what may be the result of this affair. But, if the land is parted with, 'tis all over'Tis all over: He means that he will no longer have any support from his master, and that he will have to turn soldier, and so earn his livelihood. with my neck; I must carry a buckler in foreign lands, a helmet too, and my baggage. He will be running away from the city when the nuptials have been celebrated; he will be going hence to extreme and utter ruin, somewhere or other, to serve as a soldier, either to Asia or to CiliciaAtia or to Cilicia: , Alluding, probably to the wars which were continually occurring between the Greeks and the Persian monarchs, or else to the custom of hiring themselves out as mercenary soldiers, as Xenophon and the ten thousand did to the younger Cyrus.. I will go there looking at the door of the house bouight by CALLICLES, where he has ordered me to go, although I detest this house ever since he has driven us out of our abode. (Exit into the house of CHARMIDES.)
Ostia (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
id you not receive forty minæ from Callicles, and did he not receive from you the house in possession? LESBONICUS Very good. PHILTO aside. Troth, I think our neighbour has sold his houseHas sold his house: He feels satisfied now that Lysiteles has been correctly informed, and that Lesbonicus really is in difficulties.. When his father shall come from abroad, his place is in the beggar's gateThe beggar's gate: He probably alludes to the "Porta Trigemina" at Rome, which was upon the road to Ostia. It received its name from the three twin-born brothers, the Horatii, who passed beneath it when going to fight the Curiatii. This, being one of the largest and most frequented roads in Rome, was especially the resort of mendicants; among whom, in the opinion of Philto, the father of Lesbonicus will have to take his place. Some Commentators would read "ponte" instead of "portâ," and they think that the allusion is to the Sublician bridge at Rome, where we learn from Seneca and Juvenal that t
Cilicia (Turkey) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
ckler in foreign lands, a helmet too, and my baggage. He will be running away from the city when the nuptials have been celebrated; he will be going hence to extreme and utter ruin, somewhere or other, to serve as a soldier, either to Asia or to CiliciaAtia or to Cilicia: , Alluding, probably to the wars which were continually occurring between the Greeks and the Persian monarchs, or else to the custom of hiring themselves out as mercenary soldiers, as Xenophon and the ten thousand did to the yr to Asia or to CiliciaAtia or to Cilicia: , Alluding, probably to the wars which were continually occurring between the Greeks and the Persian monarchs, or else to the custom of hiring themselves out as mercenary soldiers, as Xenophon and the ten thousand did to the younger Cyrus.. I will go there looking at the door of the house bouight by CALLICLES, where he has ordered me to go, although I detest this house ever since he has driven us out of our abode. (Exit into the house of CHARMIDES.)
Jupiter (Canada) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
o you to propose an alliance and bond of friendship between himself and your family. He wishes to take your sister for his wife; and I have the same feelings, and I desire it. LESBONICUS I really don't understand your ways; amid your prosperity you are laughing at my adversity. PHILTO I am a manI am a man: This is somewhat like the celebrated line in Terence: "Homo sum, humani nihil alienum a me puto," "I am a man, nothing that is human do I think unbecoming to me.": you are a man. So may Jupiter love me, I have neither come to laugh at you, nor do I think you deserving of it! But as to what I said, my son begged me to ask for your sister as his wife. LESBONICUS It is right that I should know the state of my own circumstances. My position is not on an equal footing with yours; seek some other alliance for yourselves. STASIMUS to LESBONICUS. Are you really sound in mind or intellect to refuse this proposal? For I perceive that he has been found for you a very friend in needFriend in
Seneca (Ohio, United States) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
as upon the road to Ostia. It received its name from the three twin-born brothers, the Horatii, who passed beneath it when going to fight the Curiatii. This, being one of the largest and most frequented roads in Rome, was especially the resort of mendicants; among whom, in the opinion of Philto, the father of Lesbonicus will have to take his place. Some Commentators would read "ponte" instead of "portâ," and they think that the allusion is to the Sublician bridge at Rome, where we learn from Seneca and Juvenal that the beggars used to sit and ask alms., unless, perchance, he should creep into his son's stomachHis son's stomach: He satirically alludes to the reckless conduct of Lesbonicus, who has spent everything to satisfy his love for eating, drinking, and debauchery.. STASIMUS There were a thousand Olympic drachmæOlympic drachmæ: As already mentioned, the "drachma" was about ninepence three-farthings in value. As one hundred made a "mina," one fourth of the price received for the
Thornton (United Kingdom) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
alent to "go and be hanged.". STASIMUS Faith, if I should commence to go, you would be forbidding meBe forbidding me: He means, that if he should take his master at his word and go away, he would be the first to stop him.. LESBONICUS Unless you want me, Philto, for anything else, I have given you my answer. PHILTO I trust, Lesbonicus, that you will one day be more obliging to me than I now find you to be. For both to actBoth to act: -2. The exact meaning of these lines is somewhat obscure. Thornton's translation is: Or in word Or deed to play the trifler would ill suit One of my years. unwisely and to talk unwisely, Lesbonicus, are sometimes neither of them profitable. STASIMUS Troth, he says what's true. LESBONICUS I will tear out your eye if you add one word. STASIMUS Troth, but I will talk; for if I may not be allowed to do so as I am, then I will submit to be called the one-eyed manThe one-eyed man: He means that he is determined to speak out at all risks, even if his master sho
Acheron (New Zealand) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
body as salt is to flesh; it preserves it from corruption. for the salt of life. The moment that we have breathed forth this, the beggar is held of equal value at AcheronAt Acheron: Acheron was a river of the Brutii in Campania. There was another river of this name in Epirus. The word usually denotes one of the rivers of Hell; herAcheron: Acheron was a river of the Brutii in Campania. There was another river of this name in Epirus. The word usually denotes one of the rivers of Hell; here it means the Infernal regions themselves. with the most wealthy man when dead. STASIMUS aside. It will be a wonder if you don't carry your riches there with you. When you are dead, you may, perhaps, be as good as your name importsAs your name imports: The meaning of Stasimus is--"Perhaps when you are dead, in leaving your properm. STASIMUS First of all then, when at any time the ground is being ploughed, in every fifth furrow the oxen die. PHILTO Preserve me from it. STASIMUS The gate of Acheron is in that land of ours. Then the grapes, before they are ripe, hang in a putrid state. LESBONICUS in a low voice. He is persuading the man to something, I think.
Epirus (Greece) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
I propose, and which I ask of you. The Gods are rich; wealth and station befit the Gods: but we poor mortal beings are, as it were, the salt-cellarThe salt-cellar: By this expression, Plautus seems to mean that life is to the body as salt is to flesh; it preserves it from corruption. for the salt of life. The moment that we have breathed forth this, the beggar is held of equal value at AcheronAt Acheron: Acheron was a river of the Brutii in Campania. There was another river of this name in Epirus. The word usually denotes one of the rivers of Hell; here it means the Infernal regions themselves. with the most wealthy man when dead. STASIMUS aside. It will be a wonder if you don't carry your riches there with you. When you are dead, you may, perhaps, be as good as your name importsAs your name imports: The meaning of Stasimus is--"Perhaps when you are dead, in leaving your property to another, you may really prove yourself the amiable man your name would bespeak you to be;" Philto bei
Campania (Italy) (search for this): act 2, scene 4
I wish you to grant and accept these terms which I propose, and which I ask of you. The Gods are rich; wealth and station befit the Gods: but we poor mortal beings are, as it were, the salt-cellarThe salt-cellar: By this expression, Plautus seems to mean that life is to the body as salt is to flesh; it preserves it from corruption. for the salt of life. The moment that we have breathed forth this, the beggar is held of equal value at AcheronAt Acheron: Acheron was a river of the Brutii in Campania. There was another river of this name in Epirus. The word usually denotes one of the rivers of Hell; here it means the Infernal regions themselves. with the most wealthy man when dead. STASIMUS aside. It will be a wonder if you don't carry your riches there with you. When you are dead, you may, perhaps, be as good as your name importsAs your name imports: The meaning of Stasimus is--"Perhaps when you are dead, in leaving your property to another, you may really prove yourself the amiable m