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Nero (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): life cal., chapter 30
sing the cruelty of Tiberius as necessary, since it was impossible to question the veracity of such a number of accusers.See before, AUGUSTUS, c. Ixxi. He continually reproached the whole equestrian order, as devoting themselves to nothing but acting on the stage, and fighting as gladiators. Being incensed at the people's applauding a party at the Circensian games in opposition to him, he exclaimed, "I wish the Roman people had but one neck."These celebrated words are generally attributed to Nero; but Dio and Seneca agree with Suetonius in ascribing them to Caligula. When Tetrinius, the highwayman, was denounced, he said his persecutors too were all Tetrinius's. Five Retiarii, Gladiators were distinguished by their armour and manner of fighting. Some were called Secutores, whose arms were a helmet, a shield, a sword, or a leaden ball. Others, the usual antagonists of the former, were named Reiani. A combatant of this class was dressed in a short tunic, but wore nothing on his head. He
Tiberius (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): life cal., chapter 30
istaking his name, he said "he deserved it quite as much." He had frequently in his mouth these words of the tragedian: Oderint dum metuant.A quotation from the tragedy of Atreus, by L. Attius, mentioned by Cicero. Off. i. 28. I scorn their hatred, if they do but fear me. He would often inveigh against all the senators writhout exception, as clients of Sejanus, and informers against his mother and brothers, producing the memorials which he had pretended to burn, and excusing the cruelty of Tiberius as necessary, since it was impossible to question the veracity of such a number of accusers.See before, AUGUSTUS, c. Ixxi. He continually reproached the whole equestrian order, as devoting themselves to nothing but acting on the stage, and fighting as gladiators. Being incensed at the people's applauding a party at the Circensian games in opposition to him, he exclaimed, "I wish the Roman people had but one neck."These celebrated words are generally attributed to Nero; but Dio and Seneca a
Seneca (Ohio, United States) (search for this): life cal., chapter 30
Tiberius as necessary, since it was impossible to question the veracity of such a number of accusers.See before, AUGUSTUS, c. Ixxi. He continually reproached the whole equestrian order, as devoting themselves to nothing but acting on the stage, and fighting as gladiators. Being incensed at the people's applauding a party at the Circensian games in opposition to him, he exclaimed, "I wish the Roman people had but one neck."These celebrated words are generally attributed to Nero; but Dio and Seneca agree with Suetonius in ascribing them to Caligula. When Tetrinius, the highwayman, was denounced, he said his persecutors too were all Tetrinius's. Five Retiarii, Gladiators were distinguished by their armour and manner of fighting. Some were called Secutores, whose arms were a helmet, a shield, a sword, or a leaden ball. Others, the usual antagonists of the former, were named Reiani. A combatant of this class was dressed in a short tunic, but wore nothing on his head. He carried in his lef