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Browsing named entities in a specific section of M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). Search the whole document.

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Asia Minor (Turkey) (search for this): book 3, card 298
Now Caesar left the walls of trembling Rome And swift across the cloudy Alpine tops He winged his march; but while all others fled Far from his path, in terror of his name, Phocaea's Massilia (Marseilles) was founded from Phocaea in Asia Minor about B.C. Lucan (line 392) appears to think that the founders were fugitives from their city when it was stormed by the Persians sixty years later. See Thucydides I., 13; Grote, ' History of Greece,' chapter xxii. manhood with un-Grecian faith Held to their pledged obedience, and dared To follow right, not fate; but first of all With olive boughs of truce before them borne The chieftain they approach, with peaceful words In hope to alter his unbending will And tame his fury. 'Search the ancient books Which chronicle the deeds of Latian fame; Thou'lt ever find, when foreign foes pressed hard, Massilia's prowess on the side of Rome.After the burning of Rome by the Celts a collection was made in Massilia in aid of those who suffered by the fire.
Saguntum (Spain) (search for this): book 3, card 298
hat thou wilt: cut off the source that fills ' Our foaming river, force us, prone in thirst, ' To dig the earth and lap the scanty pool; ' Seize on our corn and leave us food abhorred: ' This people shall not shun, for freedom's sake, ' The ills Saguntum bore in Punic siege; Murviedro of the present day. Its gallant defence against Hannibal has been compared to that of Saragossa against the French. ' Torn, vainly clinging, from the shrunken breast ' The starving babe shall perish in the flames. Murviedro of the present day. Its gallant defence against Hannibal has been compared to that of Saragossa against the French. ' Torn, vainly clinging, from the shrunken breast ' The starving babe shall perish in the flames. ' Wives at their husbands' hands shall pray their fate, ' And brothers' weapons deal a mutual death. ' Such be our civil war; not, Caesar, thine.' But Caesar's visage stern betrayed his ire Which thus broke forth in words: ' Vain is the hope Ye rest upon my march: speed though I may Towards my western goal, time still remains To blot Massilia out. Rejoice, my troops! ' Unsought the war ye longed for meets you now: The fates concede it. As the tempests lose Their strength by sturdy forests unopp
Jupiter (Canada) (search for this): book 3, card 298
wn world Thou seekest, Caesar, here our arms and swords Accept in aid: but if, in impious strife Of civil discord, with a Roman foe Thou arm'st for battle, tears we give thee then And hold aloof: no stranger hand may touch Celestial wounds. Should all Olympus' hosts Have rushed to war, or should the giant brood Assault the stars, yet men would not presume Or by their prayers or arms to help the gods: And, ignorant of the fortunes of the sky, Taught by the thunderbolts alone, would know That Jupiter supreme still held the throne. Add that unnumbered nations join the fray: Nor shrinks the world so much from taint of crime That civil wars reluctant swords require. But grant that strangers shun thy destinies And only Romans fight-shall not the son Shrink ere he strike his father? on both sides Brothers forbid the weapon to be hurled? The world's end comes when other hands are armed ' Than those which custom and the gods allow. ' For us, this is our prayer: Leave, Caesar, here ' Thy dread
Marseilles (France) (search for this): book 3, card 298
ll others fled Far from his path, in terror of his name, Phocaea's Massilia (Marseilles) was founded from Phocaea in Asia Minor about B.C. LucMarseilles) was founded from Phocaea in Asia Minor about B.C. Lucan (line 392) appears to think that the founders were fugitives from their city when it was stormed by the Persians sixty years later. See Thof Latian fame; Thou'lt ever find, when foreign foes pressed hard, Massilia's prowess on the side of Rome.After the burning of Rome by the Celts a collection was made in Massilia in aid of those who suffered by the fire. Mommsen, vol. i., p. 430. And now, if triumphs in an unknown wothy hostile signs ' Back from our gates, but enter thou in peace ' Massilia's ramparts; let our city rest ' Withdrawn from crime, to Magnus and though I may Towards my western goal, time still remains To blot Massilia out. Rejoice, my troops! ' Unsought the war ye longed for meets yo Heaved up with earthy sod; with lofty towers Crowned; and to shut Massilia from the land. Then did the Grecian city win renown Eternal, death
Phocaea (Turkey) (search for this): book 3, card 298
left the walls of trembling Rome And swift across the cloudy Alpine tops He winged his march; but while all others fled Far from his path, in terror of his name, Phocaea's Massilia (Marseilles) was founded from Phocaea in Asia Minor about B.C. Lucan (line 392) appears to think that the founders were fugitives from their city when Phocaea in Asia Minor about B.C. Lucan (line 392) appears to think that the founders were fugitives from their city when it was stormed by the Persians sixty years later. See Thucydides I., 13; Grote, ' History of Greece,' chapter xxii. manhood with un-Grecian faith Held to their pledged obedience, and dared To follow right, not fate; but first of all With olive boughs of truce before them borne The chieftain they approach, with peaceful words In h'The war commands thee? Weight nor power have we ' To sway the mighty conflicts of the world. ' We boast no victories since our fatherland 'We left in exile: when Phocaea's fort ' Perished in flames, we sought another here; 'And here on foreign shores, in narrow bounds ' Confined and safe, our boast is sturdy faith; ' Nought else.
Olympus (Greece) (search for this): book 3, card 298
when foreign foes pressed hard, Massilia's prowess on the side of Rome.After the burning of Rome by the Celts a collection was made in Massilia in aid of those who suffered by the fire. Mommsen, vol. i., p. 430. And now, if triumphs in an unknown world Thou seekest, Caesar, here our arms and swords Accept in aid: but if, in impious strife Of civil discord, with a Roman foe Thou arm'st for battle, tears we give thee then And hold aloof: no stranger hand may touch Celestial wounds. Should all Olympus' hosts Have rushed to war, or should the giant brood Assault the stars, yet men would not presume Or by their prayers or arms to help the gods: And, ignorant of the fortunes of the sky, Taught by the thunderbolts alone, would know That Jupiter supreme still held the throne. Add that unnumbered nations join the fray: Nor shrinks the world so much from taint of crime That civil wars reluctant swords require. But grant that strangers shun thy destinies And only Romans fight-shall not the son S
Caesaraugusta (Spain) (search for this): book 3, card 298
t if our city to blockade ' Is now thy mind-to force the gates, and hurl ' Javelin and blazing torch upon our homes- ' Do what thou wilt: cut off the source that fills ' Our foaming river, force us, prone in thirst, ' To dig the earth and lap the scanty pool; ' Seize on our corn and leave us food abhorred: ' This people shall not shun, for freedom's sake, ' The ills Saguntum bore in Punic siege; Murviedro of the present day. Its gallant defence against Hannibal has been compared to that of Saragossa against the French. ' Torn, vainly clinging, from the shrunken breast ' The starving babe shall perish in the flames. ' Wives at their husbands' hands shall pray their fate, ' And brothers' weapons deal a mutual death. ' Such be our civil war; not, Caesar, thine.' But Caesar's visage stern betrayed his ire Which thus broke forth in words: ' Vain is the hope Ye rest upon my march: speed though I may Towards my western goal, time still remains To blot Massilia out. Rejoice, my troops! ' Unso