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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 8 (ed. Benjamin Oliver Foster, Ph.D.). Search the whole document.

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which was thrown down to release the chariots at the start of the race. The war with Privernum was not yet out of the way, when there came an alarming report of a Gallic rising, a warning which the senate almost never disregarded. accordingly, without a moment's hesitation, the new consuls, Lucius Aemilius Mamercinus and Gaius Plautius, were directed, on the very day on which they entered office —the Kalends of JulyJuly 1st was the normal day for beginning the official year from 391 B.C. to 153 B.C., when it was changed to January 1st. —to divide the commands between them, and Mamercinus, to whom the Gallic war had fallen, was bidden to enlist an army without granting a single exemption; indeed it is said that a rabble of craftsmen even, and sedentary mechanics, was called out —a type the least qualified of all for military service. An enormous army was brought together at Veii, which was to be the base for the campaign against the Gauls; further afield they wou<
hrown down to release the chariots at the start of the race. The war with Privernum was not yet out of the way, when there came an alarming report of a Gallic rising, a warning which the senate almost never disregarded. accordingly, without a moment's hesitation, the new consuls, Lucius Aemilius Mamercinus and Gaius Plautius, were directed, on the very day on which they entered office —the Kalends of JulyJuly 1st was the normal day for beginning the official year from 391 B.C. to 153 B.C., when it was changed to January 1st. —to divide the commands between them, and Mamercinus, to whom the Gallic war had fallen, was bidden to enlist an army without granting a single exemption; indeed it is said that a rabble of craftsmen even, and sedentary mechanics, was called out —a type the least qualified of all for military service. An enormous army was brought together at Veii, which was to be the base for the campaign against the Gauls; further afield they would not go, l<