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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 28 (ed. Frank Gardener Moore, Professor Emeritus in Columbia University). Search the whole document.

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ound. Mago then reached Gades on the ships sent back by Hasdrubal. The rest, abandoned by their generals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to inclu
rals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to include a seemingly impossible range of operations within what remained of the same year, 206 B.C.
rals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to include a seemingly impossible range of operations within what remained of the same year, 206 B.C.
f chiefs and states as he proceeded, in order to bestow rewards according to the real worth of their services. After his departure Masinissa conferred secretly with Silanus, then crossedB.C. 206 over to Africa with a few of his countrymen, in order that in changing his policy he might count upon the obedience of his nation also. The reason for his sudden change was not so clear then as was later the evidence furnished by a loyalty unswerving down to extreme age,He lived on until 148 B.C., upwards of 90 years old, and reigned 60 years; App. Pun. 106; Pliny N.H. VII. 156. that even at that time he had not acted without a reasonable ground. Mago then reached Gades on the ships sent back by Hasdrubal. The rest, abandoned by their generals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of P
rals, were scattered, some by desertion, others by flight, among the neighbouring states; no force remained which was notable for its numbers or its strength. So much in general for the manner in which under the command and auspices of Publius Scipio the Carthaginians were driven out of Spain in the fourteenth yearAn error corrected by x. 8 and xxxviii. 12, the 14th year of the war being 205 B.C. from the beginning of the war, the fifthLivy had assigned Scipio's arrival in Spain to the year 211 B.C.; XXVI. xix, 11 ff. Consequently he placed the capture of New Carthage in 210 B.C. See Vol. VII. notes on pp. 68, 230, 296; Scullard, 304 ff. after Publius Scipio received his province and army. Not much later Silanus returned to Scipio at Tarraco, reporting the war at an end.Although his readers would here infer that a campaign has now been completed, the historian goes on to include a seemingly impossible range of operations within what remained of the same year, 206 B.C.