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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 40 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). Search the whole document.

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above), but it is not likely that after serving in some unspecified capacity under his brother in Spain in 181 B.C. he should have served as military tribune under his cousin in 180 B.C. in Italy. The consul of 179 B.C., during his censorship in 174 B.C., expelled from the senate his own brother, and Valerius Maximus (II. vii. 5, repeated by Frontinus, Strat. IV. i. 31) asserts that the degradation was due to the discharge of a legion of which he was military tribune. The brother is called simplproduce hopeless confusion. All one can say is that at this time Livy apparently thought that the tribune was the brother of the consul under whom he served. In this connection, I believe that it has not been pointed out that the other censor of 174 B.C. was the other consul of 180 B.C., who, in sect. 10 below, procured the banishment of Nobilior. Perhaps he was actually more responsible than his colleague for the degradation. The cognomen Nobilior remains unexplained on any hypothesis. —this Fu
Postumius was incommand. The brother of Quintus Fulvius, Marcus Fulvius NobiliorThe brother of either Q. Fulvius Flaccus —the consul of 180 B.C. or the consul of 179 B.C., who was at this time still in Spain or on the way back —should have had the cognomen Flaccus, unless he had been adopted by some Fulvius Nobilior, and ofime. One naturally assumes from Livy's language here that Q. Fulvii refers to the consul of 180 B.C., but no brother Marcus is mentioned elsewhere. The consul of 179 B.C. had a brother Marcus (xxx. 4 above), but it is not likely that after serving in some unspecified capacity under his brother in Spain in 181 B.C. he should have served as military tribune under his cousin in 180 B.C. in Italy. The consul of 179 B.C., during his censorship in 174 B.C., expelled from the senate his own brother, and Valerius Maximus (II. vii. 5, repeated by Frontinus, Strat. IV. i. 31) asserts that the degradation was due to the discharge of a legion of which he was military
ncommand. The brother of Quintus Fulvius, Marcus Fulvius NobiliorThe brother of either Q. Fulvius Flaccus —the consul of 180 B.C. or the consul of 179 B.C., who was at this time still in Spain or on the way back —should have had the cognomen Fknown to have lived at this time. One naturally assumes from Livy's language here that Q. Fulvii refers to the consul of 180 B.C., but no brother Marcus is mentioned elsewhere. The consul of 179 B.C. had a brother Marcus (xxx. 4 above), but it is notnspecified capacity under his brother in Spain in 181 B.C. he should have served as military tribune under his cousin in 180 B.C. in Italy. The consul of 179 B.C., during his censorship in 174 B.C., expelled from the senate his own brother, and ValerIn this connection, I believe that it has not been pointed out that the other censor of 174 B.C. was the other consul of 180 B.C., who, in sect. 10 below, procured the banishment of Nobilior. Perhaps he was actually more responsible than his colleagu
the cognomen Flaccus, unless he had been adopted by some Fulvius Nobilior, and of such an adoption there is no record. There is moreover no Q. Fulvius Nobilior known to have lived at this time. One naturally assumes from Livy's language here that Q. Fulvii refers to the consul of 180 B.C., but no brother Marcus is mentioned elsewhere. The consul of 179 B.C. had a brother Marcus (xxx. 4 above), but it is not likely that after serving in some unspecified capacity under his brother in Spain in 181 B.C. he should have served as military tribune under his cousin in 180 B.C. in Italy. The consul of 179 B.C., during his censorship in 174 B.C., expelled from the senate his own brother, and Valerius Maximus (II. vii. 5, repeated by Frontinus, Strat. IV. i. 31) asserts that the degradation was due to the discharge of a legion of which he was military tribune. The brother is called simply Fulvius, with no praenomen. Livy (XLI. xxvii. 2) and Velleius (I. x. 6) likewise refer to the expulsion, the