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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 40 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). Search the whole document.

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and ended their feud. After that, followed by the applause of all, they were escorted to the Capitoline. Both the interest of the leaders in such a situation and the readiness of the censors to yield were notably approved and lauded by the senate. Then, on the demand of the censors that the sum of money which they were to use on public works be assigned them, one year's revenue was decreed to them.Livy has not mentioned a corresponding sum before. The censors of 169 B.C. received the revenue for half a year (XLIV. xvi. 9). There is no translation of the expression into definite figures until 62 B.C. (Plutarch, Pompey, 45), when one year's revenue amounted to 50,000,000 denarii. Frank (Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, Baltimore, 1933, I. 152-153) estimates the revenue in 179 B.C. as perhaps one-tenth of that sum. He further calculates that the Basilica Aemilia (li. 5 below) would have cost 12,000 denarii, so that a good deal could be done with 5,000,000 denarii.
ave one another, and ended their feud. After that, followed by the applause of all, they were escorted to the Capitoline. Both the interest of the leaders in such a situation and the readiness of the censors to yield were notably approved and lauded by the senate. Then, on the demand of the censors that the sum of money which they were to use on public works be assigned them, one year's revenue was decreed to them.Livy has not mentioned a corresponding sum before. The censors of 169 B.C. received the revenue for half a year (XLIV. xvi. 9). There is no translation of the expression into definite figures until 62 B.C. (Plutarch, Pompey, 45), when one year's revenue amounted to 50,000,000 denarii. Frank (Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, Baltimore, 1933, I. 152-153) estimates the revenue in 179 B.C. as perhaps one-tenth of that sum. He further calculates that the Basilica Aemilia (li. 5 below) would have cost 12,000 denarii, so that a good deal could be done with 5,000,000 dena
and ended their feud. After that, followed by the applause of all, they were escorted to the Capitoline. Both the interest of the leaders in such a situation and the readiness of the censors to yield were notably approved and lauded by the senate. Then, on the demand of the censors that the sum of money which they were to use on public works be assigned them, one year's revenue was decreed to them.Livy has not mentioned a corresponding sum before. The censors of 169 B.C. received the revenue for half a year (XLIV. xvi. 9). There is no translation of the expression into definite figures until 62 B.C. (Plutarch, Pompey, 45), when one year's revenue amounted to 50,000,000 denarii. Frank (Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, Baltimore, 1933, I. 152-153) estimates the revenue in 179 B.C. as perhaps one-tenth of that sum. He further calculates that the Basilica Aemilia (li. 5 below) would have cost 12,000 denarii, so that a good deal could be done with 5,000,000 denarii.