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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Titus Livius (Livy), The History of Rome, Book 41 (ed. Evan T. Sage, Ph.D. and Alfred C. Schlesinger, Ph.D.). Search the whole document.

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The Celtiberians in Spain, who had surrendered to Tiberius GracchusGracchus went to Spain in 179 B.C. (XL. xlvii. 1); his return and triumph in 177 B.C. were reported at vi. 4 and vii. 2 above. after their defeat in the war, had remained quiet while Marcus TitiniusTitinius was one of the unnamed praetors for 178 B.C. (XL. lix. 5). held the province as praetor. They rebelled on theB.C. 174 arrival of Appius ClaudiusThe election of Claudius as praetor in 175 B.C. was presumably recorded in the lost text of chap. Xviii. and began the war by a surprise attack on the Roman camp. It was about daybreak, when the sentinels were on the rampart and the outposts were on guard at the gates, that they saw the enemy coming afar off and called the troops to arms. Appius Claudius, after displaying the signal for battle and briefly exhorting the troops, led them out by three gates at once. The Celtiberians met them as they came out, and at first there was a drawn battle, since on acco
The Celtiberians in Spain, who had surrendered to Tiberius GracchusGracchus went to Spain in 179 B.C. (XL. xlvii. 1); his return and triumph in 177 B.C. were reported at vi. 4 and vii. 2 above. after their defeat in the war, had remained quiet while Marcus TitiniusTitinius was one of the unnamed praetors for 178 B.C. (XL. lix. 5). held the province as praetor. They rebelled on theB.C. 174 arrival of Appius ClaudiusThe election of Claudius as praetor in 175 B.C. was presumably recorded in the lost text of chap. Xviii. and began the war by a surprise attack on the Roman camp. It was about daybreak, when the sentinels were on the rampart and the outposts were on guard at the gates, that they saw the enemy coming afar off and called the troops to arms. Appius Claudius, after displaying the signal for battle and briefly exhorting the troops, led them out by three gates at once. The Celtiberians met them as they came out, and at first there was a drawn battle, since on acco
The Celtiberians in Spain, who had surrendered to Tiberius GracchusGracchus went to Spain in 179 B.C. (XL. xlvii. 1); his return and triumph in 177 B.C. were reported at vi. 4 and vii. 2 above. after their defeat in the war, had remained quiet while Marcus TitiniusTitinius was one of the unnamed praetors for 178 B.C. (XL. lix. 5). held the province as praetor. They rebelled on theB.C. 174 arrival of Appius ClaudiusThe election of Claudius as praetor in 175 B.C. was presumably recorded in the lost text of chap. Xviii. and began the war by a surprise attack on the Roman camp. It was about daybreak, when the sentinels were on the rampart and the outposts were on guard at the gates, that they saw the enemy coming afar off and called the troops to arms. Appius Claudius, after displaying the signal for battle and briefly exhorting the troops, led them out by three gates at once. The Celtiberians met them as they came out, and at first there was a drawn battle, since on acco
The Celtiberians in Spain, who had surrendered to Tiberius GracchusGracchus went to Spain in 179 B.C. (XL. xlvii. 1); his return and triumph in 177 B.C. were reported at vi. 4 and vii. 2 above. after their defeat in the war, had remained quiet while Marcus TitiniusTitinius was one of the unnamed praetors for 178 B.C. (XL. lix. 5). held the province as praetor. They rebelled on theB.C. 174 arrival of Appius ClaudiusThe election of Claudius as praetor in 175 B.C. was presumably recorded in the lost text of chap. Xviii. and began the war by a surprise attack on the Roman camp. It was about daybreak, when the sentinels were on the rampart and the outposts were on guard at the gates, that they saw the enemy coming afar off and called the troops to arms. Appius Claudius, after displaying the signal for battle and briefly exhorting the troops, led them out by three gates at once. The Celtiberians met them as they came out, and at first there was a drawn battle, since on acco