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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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Armenia (Armenia) (search for this): narrative 151
a, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that one village of Armenia named Gilgat doeth care yeerely five hundred, and sometime a thousand mules laden with silke to Halepo in Soria of Turkie, being 4. dayes journey from Tripoli , where the Venetians have their continuall abiding, and send from thence silks which they returne for English karsies and other clothes into all partes of Christendome.
Vologda (Russia) (search for this): narrative 151
but once in two yeeres, by a long and dangerous voiage all by sea: for where as the citie and Island of Ormus, lying in the gulfe of Persia, is the most famous Mart towne of all East India, whither al ye merchandises of India are brought, the same may in shorter time and more safely be brought by land and rivers through Persia, even unto the Caspian sea, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that
Russia (Russia) (search for this): narrative 151
England, the returne may be made every yeere once: whereas the Portugals make the returne from Calecut but once in two yeeres, by a long and dangerous voiage all by sea: for where as the citie and Island of Ormus, lying in the gulfe of Persia, is the most famous Mart towne of all East India, whither al ye merchandises of India are brought, the same may in shorter time and more safely be brought by land and rivers through Persia, even unto the Caspian sea, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more
Ormus (Iran) (search for this): narrative 151
uble them, and to stand in any Caravan where they will, or shal thinke good. THE commodities which the merchants may have by this trade into Persia are thought to bee great, and may in time perhaps be greater then the Portugals trade into ye East Indies, forasmuch as by the way of Persia into England, the returne may be made every yeere once: whereas the Portugals make the returne from Calecut but once in two yeeres, by a long and dangerous voiage all by sea: for where as the citie and Island of Ormus, lying in the gulfe of Persia, is the most famous Mart towne of all East India, whither al ye merchandises of India are brought, the same may in shorter time and more safely be brought by land and rivers through Persia, even unto the Caspian sea, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of
Tripoli (Libya) (search for this): narrative 151
a, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that one village of Armenia named Gilgat doeth care yeerely five hundred, and sometime a thousand mules laden with silke to Halepo in Soria of Turkie, being 4. dayes journey from Tripoli , where the Venetians have their continuall abiding, and send from thence silks which they returne for English karsies and other clothes into all partes of Christendome.
London (Alabama, United States) (search for this): narrative 151
a, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that one village of Armenia named Gilgat doeth care yeerely five hundred, and sometime a thousand mules laden with silke to Halepo in Soria of Turkie, being 4. dayes journey from Tripoli , where the Venetians have their continuall abiding, and send from thence silks which they returne for English karsies and other clothes into all partes of Christendome.
Gilan (Iran) (search for this): narrative 151
The Articles of the second priviledge delivered to Laurence Chapman, which are to be annexed unto the former priviledge. Item, that the merchants have free libertie, as in their first priviledge, to goe unto Gilan , and all other places of his dominions, now or hereafter when occasion shall be given. Item, if by misfortune any of their ships should breake, or fall upon any part of his dominions on the sea coast, his subjects to helpe with all speed to save the goods and to be delivered to any of the sayd merchants that liveth : or otherwise to be kept in safetie until any of them come to demaund them. Item, if any of the said merchants depart this life in any citie or towne, or on the high way, his governours there to see their goods safely kept, and to be delivered to any other of them that shall demand them. Item, the said merchants to take such camel-men as they themselves wil, being countrey people, and that no Kissell Bash do let or hinder them. And the said owners of the c