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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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Fleming (New Mexico, United States) (search for this): narrative 18
f this land On the one side hath, as I understand, A prince riding with his swerd ydraw, In the other side sitting, soth it is in saw, Betokening good rule and punishing In very deede of England by the king. And it is so, God blessed mought he bee. So in likewise I would were on the see By the Noble, that swerde should have power, And the ships on the sea about us here. What needeth a garland which is made of Ivie Shewe a taverne winelesse, also thrive I? If men were wise, the Frenchmen and Fleming Shuld bere no state in sea by werring. Then Hankin lyons shuld not be so bold To stoppe wine, and shippes for to hold Unto our shame. He had be beten thence. Alas, alas, why did we this offence, Fully to shend the old English fames; And the profits of England, and their names: Why is this power called of covetise; With false colours cast beforn our eyes? That if good men called werriours Would take in hand for the commons succours, To purge the sea unto our great avayle, And winne hem goods
Bere (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 18
ould by sea have no deliverance. Wee should hem stop, and we should hem destroy, As prisoners we should hem bring to annoy. And so we should of our cruell enimies Make our friends for feare of marchandies, If they were not suffered for to passe Into Flanders. But we be frayle as glasse And also brittle, not thought never abiding; But when grace shineth soone are we sliding; We will it not receive in any wise: That maken lust, envie, and covetise: Expone me this; and yee shall sooth it find, Bere it away, and keepe it in your mind. Then shuld worship unto our Noble bee In feate and forme to lord and Majestie: Liche as the seale the greatest of this land On the one side hath, as I understand, A prince riding with his swerd ydraw, In the other side sitting, soth it is in saw, Betokening good rule and punishing In very deede of England by the king. And it is so, God blessed mought he bee. So in likewise I would were on the see By the Noble, that swerde should have power, And the ships o