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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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ed along the coast, & ancred by the shore all the night, and ran this day 10. leagues. The 20. day the Hinde having ankered by us amongst rockes, and foule ground, lost a small anker. At noone, as we passed along the coast, there came forth a Negro to us, making signes, that if we would goe a shoare, wee should have Graines, and where wee ankered at night, there came another to us, and brought Graines, and shewed us them, and made signes that wee should tary, and made a fire upon the land ier, and bare with her, and understood that shee had made some sales. The 26 day wee received out of the Hinde 48 li. 3 ounces and one eight part of golde, which they had taken in the time that we were from them. And this day upon the request of a Negro that came unto us from a captaine, we went to shoare with our marchandize, and tooke 7 li. and one ounce of gold. At this place they required no gages of us, but at night they sent a man aboord us, which lay with us all night, because we might
Palma (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): narrative 523
We suppose we ranne this day and night 30. leagues. The fourth day wee lay becalmed under the Isle of Madera, untill one of the clocke at afternoone, and then, the winde comming into the East, wee went our course, and ranne that day fifteene leagues. The 5. day we ranne 15. leagues more. The 6. day in the morning we raysed the Isle of Tenerif, otherwise called the Pike, because it is a very high Island, with a pike upon the top like a loafe of suger. The same night we raised the Isle of Palma, which is a high land also, and to the Westward of the Isle of Tenerif. The 7. day we perceived the Isle of Gomera, which is an Island standing betwixt Tenerif and Palma, about 12. leagues Eastward from Palma, and 8. leagues Westward from Tenerif : and for feare of being becalmed with the Isle of Tenerif, we left both it, and Gomera to the Eastward of us, and went betwixt Palma and Gomera. We ranne this day and night 30. leagues. Note that these Islands be 60. leagues from Madera,
Dartmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 523
a, with two Ships, in the yeere 1555. UPON Munday the thirtieth day of September wee departed from the Isle of Wight, out of the haven of Neuport with two good shippes, the one called the Hart, the other the Hinde, both of London, and the Masters of them were John Ralph, and William Carter, for a voyage to bee made unto the River de Sestos in Guinea, and to other havens thereabout. It fell out by the varietie of windes, that it was the foureteenth day of October before wee coulde fetch Dartmouth : and being there arrived wee continued in that roade sixe dayes, and the 20. of October we warpt out of the haven, and set saile, directing our course towards the Southwest, and the next morning we were runne by estimation thirty leagues. The first of November we found ourselves to be in 31. degrees of latitude by the reckoning of our Master. This day we ranne about 40. leagues also. The second day we ranne 36. leagues. The third day we had sight of Porto Santo, which is a smal
Ireland (Irish Republic) (search for this): narrative 523
und our selves to be in 22 degrees. This day one of our men called William King, who had bene long sicke, died in his sleepe, his apparell was distributed to those that lackt it, and his money was kept for his friends to be delivered them at his comming home. The 30 day we found our selves to be under the Tropike. The 31 day we went our course, and made way 18 leagues. From the first day of Aprill to the 20 we went our course, and then found our selves to bee in the height of the Asores. The seventh day of May we fell with the South part of Ireland , and going on shoare with our boate had fresh drinke, and two sheepe of the countrey people, which were wilde Kernes, and we gave them golde for them, and bought further such other victuals as we had neede of, and thought would serve us till we arrived in England. The 14 day with the afternoone tide we went into the Port of Bristoll called Hungrode, and there ankered in safetie and gave thankes to God for our safe arrivall.
Cannes (France) (search for this): narrative 523
hing but that which they might spare us for our money. So we tooke of them 3. Tapnets of figges, two small pots of oyle, two pipes of water, foure hogsheads of saltfish which they had taken upon the coast, and certaine fresh fish which they did not esteeme, because there is such store upon that coast, that in an houre and sometime lesse, a man may take as much fish as will serve twentie men a day. For these things, and for some wine which wee dranke aboorde of them, and three or foure great Cannes which they sent aboord of our shippes, I payed them twentie and seven Pistolets, which was twise as much as they willingly would have taken: and so let them goe to their ancre and cable which they had let slippe, and got it againe by our helpe. After this wee set saile, but the winde caused us to ancre againe about twelve leagues off the river del Oro, as the Portugals tolde us. There were five Carvels more in this place, but when they sawe us, they made all away for feare of us. The 15.
Sestos (Turkey) (search for this): narrative 523
long the shoare, within two leagues alwayes of the same, and found the land all as at the first, ful of woods and great rocks hard aboord the shoare, and the billow beating so sore, that the seas brake upon the shoare as white as snow, and the water mounted so high that a man might easily discerne it 4. leagues off, in such wise that no boate could land there. Thus we ran until 12. of the clocke, and then they tooke the Sunne and after judged themselves to be 24. leagues past the river de Sestos to the Eastwards, by reason whereof we halled into the shoare within two English miles, and there ancred and found fifteene fadom water, and all off from the shoare the sea so smooth, that we might wel have rid by an Hawser. All that after-noone we trimmed our boate and made her a saile, to the ende that she might go along by the shoore to seeke some place to water in: for wee could not goe backe againe to the river de Sestos, because the winde blowes alwayes contrary, and the Currant runne
Ferro (Mato Grosso, Brazil) (search for this): narrative 523
agues from Madera, and that there are 3. Islands more to the Westward of Tenerif, named the Grand Canaria, Forte-ventura, & Lancerot, of which Islands we came not in sight: they be inhabited by Spaniards. This day also we had sight of the Isle of Ferro, which is to the Southwards 13. leagues from the other Islands, and is possessed by Spaniards. All this day and night by reason of the winde we could not double the point of the Isle of Ferro, except we would have gone to the Westward of it, Isle of Ferro, except we would have gone to the Westward of it, which had bene much out of our course: therefore we kept about, and ranne backe five houres Eastnortheast to the ende we might double it upon the next boord, the winde continuing Southeast, which hath not bene often seene upon that coast by any travailers: for the winde continueth there for the most part Northeast, & East Northeast: so upon the other boord by the next morning we were in a maner with the Island, and had roome ynough to double the same. The 8. day we kept our course as neer
Dabo (France) (search for this): narrative 523
, Hennes ynough. Zeramme afoye, Have you ynough? Begge sacke, Give me a knife. Begge come, Give me bread. Borke, Holde your peace. Coutrecke, Ye lye. Veede, Put foorth, or emptie. Brekeke, Rowe. Diago, Their Captaine, and some call him Dabo . These and other wordes they speake very thicke, and oftentimes recite one word three times together, and at the last time longer then at the two first. The 18. day towards night, as we were sailing along the coast, we met with certaine boats in the sea, & the men shewed us that there was a river thwart of us, where there were Graines to be sold, but we thought it not good to tary there, least the other ships should get before us. This river hath lying before it three great rockes, and
Madera (California, United States) (search for this): narrative 523
he West ende of it is lower with certaine small round hillocks. This Island lyeth in thirty and three degrees. The same day at 11. of the clocke we raysed the Isle of Madera, which lieth 12. leagues from Porto Santo, towards the Southwest: that Island is a faire Island and fruitfull, and is inhabited by Portugals, it riseth afarreike a great whole land and high. By three of the clocke this day at after noone we were thwart of Porto Santo, and we set our course Southwest, to leave the Isle of Madera to the Eastward, as we did Porto Santo. These two Islands were the first land that we saw since wee left the coast of England. About three of the clocke aftert, and by meanes of the high hilles there, we were becalmed : We suppose we ranne this day and night 30. leagues. The fourth day wee lay becalmed under the Isle of Madera, untill one of the clocke at afternoone, and then, the winde comming into the East, wee went our course, and ranne that day fifteene leagues. The 5. day we
Gomera (Spain) (search for this): narrative 523
ll one of the clocke at afternoone, and then, the winde comming into the East, wee went our course, and ranne that day fifteene leagues. The 5. day we ranne 15. leagues more. The 6. day in the morning we raysed the Isle of Tenerif, otherwise called the Pike, because it is a very high Island, with a pike upon the top like a loafe of suger. The same night we raised the Isle of Palma, which is a high land also, and to the Westward of the Isle of Tenerif. The 7. day we perceived the Isle of Gomera, which is an Island standing betwixt Tenerif and Palma, about 12. leagues Eastward from Palma, and 8. leagues Westward from Tenerif : and for feare of being becalmed with the Isle of Tenerif, we left both it, and Gomera to the Eastward of us, and went betwixt Palma and Gomera. We ranne this day and night 30. leagues. Note that these Islands be 60. leagues from Madera, and that there are 3. Islands more to the Westward of Tenerif, named the Grand Canaria, Forte-ventura, & Lancerot, of
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