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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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Birds (Georgia, United States) (search for this): narrative 666
we fell to fishing where the Cods did bite at least 20 fathomes above ground, and almost as fast as we could hale them into the ship. The 14 we came to the 2 Islands of Birds, some 23 leagues from Menego: where there were such abundance of Birds, as is almost incredible to report. And upon the lesse of these Islands of Birds, we sIslands of Birds, we saw great store of Morsses or Sea Oxen, which were a sleepe upon the rockes: but when we approched nere unto them with our boate they cast themselves into the sea and pursued us with such furie as that we were glad to flee from them. The 16 we arrived at Brians Island, which lyeth 5 leagues West from the Island of Birds. About thIsland of Birds. About this Island ther is as great aboundance of cods as in any place can be found. In litle more then an houre we caught with 4 hookes 250 of them. Here we caught also a great Turbut which was an elle long and a yard broad: which was so great that the hooke could not hold her into the ship: but when she was above water she bent the hoo
Dartmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 666
ements, and evill marinership we were faine to dance the hay foure dayes together, sometimes running to the Northeast, sometimes to the Southeast, then againe to the East, and Eastnortheast. Thus did we spend faire winds, and lose our time untill the last of August. And then it pleased God that we fell with the Island of Lundy within the channel of Bristoll; from whence we shaped our course: and after divers dangers, the third of September we met with the Tramontane of the Queene off of Dartmouth ; to the captaine whereof we gave certaine things that he had need of. The fift of September I landed on the outside of the Isle of Wight, and within few dayes after it pleased God to bring the ship in safety to London , where she was made prize as belonging to the enemies of this land. Certaine observations touching the countreys and places where we travelled.THE Newfoundland we found very subject to fogs and mists. The ground of it is very rocky: and upon it there is great store of firr
The Island (United States) (search for this): narrative 666
e it hath great abundance of cod-fish. We were on land in it in foure severall places: 1 At Caplin bay and Farrillon: 2 At Cape Rase: 3 At the harborow of Lano, which lieth foure leagues to the West beyond Cape Laurence: 4 At S. Marie port. The Island of Menego for the soile is much like Newfoundland , but the fish about it, as also throwout the Grande Bay within Cape Briton, is much larger and better then that of the Newfoundland . This Island is scant two leagues long, and very narrow. Insland wee found to be very good, and sandy ground. It hath in it store of firre trees. It is somewhat more then a league long, and about three leagues in compasse. Here we were on land once, and went from the one side of it to the other. The Island of Ramea we tooke to be like ground as Brions Island, having also abundance of firre trees. It seemeth to be in length about twelve or thirteene leagues at least. We were there in harborow, but not on shore, which we much desired, and hoped t
Canada (Canada) (search for this): narrative 666
The voyage of M. Charles Leigh, and divers others to Cape Briton and the Isle of Ramea. THE Hopewell of London of the burthen of 120 tunnes, whereof was M. William Crafton, and the Chancewel of London of the burthen of 70 tunnes, wherof was M. Steven Bennet, bound unto the river of Canada , set to sea at the sole and proper charge of Charles Leigh and Abraham Van Herwick of London merchants (the saide Charles Leigh himselfe, and Steven Van Herwick brother to the sayd Abraham, going themselves in the said ships as chiefe commanders of the voyage) departed from Graves-end on Fryday morning the 8 of April 1597. And after some hindrances, arriving at Falmouth in Cornewal the 28 of the said moneth put to sea againe. And with prosperous windes the 18 of May we were upon the banke of Newfoundland . The 19 we lost the Chancewel. The 20 we had sight of land and entred within the bay of Assumption, where our men contrary to my knowledge fought with a French ship: and afterward in the sam
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): narrative 666
es the 18 of May we were upon the banke of Newfoundland . The 19 we lost the Chancewel. The 20 we hch were larger and better fish then any in Newfoundland . The 13 wee weyed anker againe, and being ur course toward the bay of S. Laurence in Newfoundland : where wee hoped to finde a Spanish ship, which is an harborow in the North part of Newfoundland , where we expected another prize. But when faire winde, we put off from the coast of Newfoundland , and kept our course directly for England ountreys and places where we travelled.THE Newfoundland we found very subject to fogs and mists. Tland of Menego for the soile is much like Newfoundland , but the fish about it, as also throwout tis much larger and better then that of the Newfoundland . This Island is scant two leagues long, anpe Briton we found to be somewhat like the Newfoundland , but rather better. Here toward the West ee hils: as we did also at Cape Laurence in Newfoundland . The Easterly end of the land of Cape Brit
Lundy (California, United States) (search for this): narrative 666
England , we sounded and found ground at seventy fadoms. Some of the mariners thinking we were in Bristow channell, and other in Silly channell: so that through variety of judgements, and evill marinership we were faine to dance the hay foure dayes together, sometimes running to the Northeast, sometimes to the Southeast, then againe to the East, and Eastnortheast. Thus did we spend faire winds, and lose our time untill the last of August. And then it pleased God that we fell with the Island of Lundy within the channel of Bristoll; from whence we shaped our course: and after divers dangers, the third of September we met with the Tramontane of the Queene off of Dartmouth ; to the captaine whereof we gave certaine things that he had need of. The fift of September I landed on the outside of the Isle of Wight, and within few dayes after it pleased God to bring the ship in safety to London , where she was made prize as belonging to the enemies of this land. Certaine observations touchin
Ramea (Canada) (search for this): narrative 666
The voyage of M. Charles Leigh, and divers others to Cape Briton and the Isle of Ramea. THE Hopewell of London of the burthen of 120 tunnes, whereof was M. William Crafton, and the Chancewel of London of the burthen of 70 tunnes, wherof was M. Steveoles of raine water. The same day at night we weyed anker againe. The 17 we had stormy weather. The 18 we came to the Isle of Ramea, where we appointed to meet with our consort. And approching neere unto the harborough of Halabolina we cast anker inthree leagues in compasse. Here we were on land once, and went from the one side of it to the other. The Island of Ramea we tooke to be like ground as Brions Island, having also abundance of firre trees. It seemeth to be in length about twelv5 at Port Ingles, or the English port. Concerning the nature and fruitfulnesse of Brions Island, Isle Blanche, and of Ramea , they do by nature yeeld exceeding plenty of wood, great store of wild come like barley, strawberries, gooseberries, mulb
London (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 666
ds, and lose our time untill the last of August. And then it pleased God that we fell with the Island of Lundy within the channel of Bristoll; from whence we shaped our course: and after divers dangers, the third of September we met with the Tramontane of the Queene off of Dartmouth ; to the captaine whereof we gave certaine things that he had need of. The fift of September I landed on the outside of the Isle of Wight, and within few dayes after it pleased God to bring the ship in safety to London , where she was made prize as belonging to the enemies of this land. Certaine observations touching the countreys and places where we travelled.THE Newfoundland we found very subject to fogs and mists. The ground of it is very rocky: and upon it there is great store of firre trees, and in some places red; and about the shore it hath great abundance of cod-fish. We were on land in it in foure severall places: 1 At Caplin bay and Farrillon: 2 At Cape Rase: 3 At the harborow of Lano, which li
Falmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): narrative 666
afton, and the Chancewel of London of the burthen of 70 tunnes, wherof was M. Steven Bennet, bound unto the river of Canada , set to sea at the sole and proper charge of Charles Leigh and Abraham Van Herwick of London merchants (the saide Charles Leigh himselfe, and Steven Van Herwick brother to the sayd Abraham, going themselves in the said ships as chiefe commanders of the voyage) departed from Graves-end on Fryday morning the 8 of April 1597. And after some hindrances, arriving at Falmouth in Cornewal the 28 of the said moneth put to sea againe. And with prosperous windes the 18 of May we were upon the banke of Newfoundland . The 19 we lost the Chancewel. The 20 we had sight of land and entred within the bay of Assumption, where our men contrary to my knowledge fought with a French ship: and afterward in the same bay wee met with our consort. Whereupon we presently put to sea againe: and the next day we arrived at Caplen bay, where we remained by extremitie of foule weather,
Hopewell (Ohio, United States) (search for this): narrative 666
us by the other shippe, which afterward was quieted. The second day of August, having taken in water and wood, we put to sea from that harborow in company of the Hopewell , with purpose to go directly to Parlican, which is an harborow in the North part of Newfoundland , where we expected another prize. But when we came to sea we fot, as that we were constrained to make our resolution directly for England : whereupon we drew out our reasons the fourth day of August, and sent them aboord the Hopewell , to certifie them the cause of our resolution for England : wherat they were generally offended, thinking and saying, that we in the prize went about to cousin aof warre. The next day being the fift of August, having a faire winde, we put off from the coast of Newfoundland , and kept our course directly for England , the Hopewell keeping us company untill midday, whenas having lost us in a fogge, she shot off two pieces of ordinance, and we answered her with three: afterwards we spake not
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