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Cartagena (Spain) (search for this): narrative 668
harvest, they passed the Summer till the tenth of June: at which time their corne which they had sowed was within one fortnight of reaping: but then it happened that Sir Francis Drake in his prosperous returne from the sacking of Sant Domingo, Cartagena , and Saint Augustine, determined in his way homeward to visit his countreymen the English Colony then remaining in Virginia . So passing along the coasts of Florida , he fell with the parts where our English Colony inhabited: and having espied her Spanish shippe being pearced with nine shotte under water, got away; whom our Viceadmirall intended to pursue: but some of their men in the toppe made certaine rockes, which they saw above water neere the shoare, to be Gallies of Havana and Cartagena , comming from Havana to rescue the two Ships; Wherefore they gave over their chase, and went for England . After this intelligence was given us by this our prize, he departed from us, and went for England . On Saturday the 19. of Septemb
, as also climing towardes the tops of high Cedars, that I thinke in all the world the like abundance is not to be found: and my selfe having seene those parts of Europe that most abound, find such difference as were incredible to be written. We passed from the Sea side towardes the toppes of those hilles next adjoyning, being in one of them the Kings brother, accompanied with fortie or fiftie men, very handsome and goodly people, and in their behaviour as mannerly and civill as any of Europe . His name was Granganimeo, and the king is called Wingina, the countrey Wingandacoa, and now by her Majestie Virginia. The maner of his comming was in this sort: alfe an inch broad. The like groweth in Persia , which is in the selfe same climate as Virginia , of which very many of the Silke works that come from thence into Europe are made. Hereof if it be planted and ordered as in Persia , it cannot in reason be otherwise, but that there will rise in short time great profit to the dealers
Dominica (Dominica) (search for this): narrative 668
and from thence we continued our course for Dominica , one of the Antiles of the West India, where June. THE 19 we fell with Dominica , and the same evening we sayled betweene it,adalupe : the 21 the Fly-boat also fell with Dominica . The 22 we came to an anker at an Island from Grand Canary, and framed our course for Dominica . The last of Aprill we saw Dominica , Dominica , and the same night we came to an anker on the Southside thereof. our Admirall and our Pinnesse departed from Dominica leaving the John our Vice-admirall playing off and on about Dominica , hoping to take some Spaniard outwardes bound to the Indies; the same nig9 our Viceadmirall, from whom we departed at Dominica , came to us at Saona, with whom we left a Spof the Viceadmirall, at their departure from Dominica brought away two young Salvages, which were Casiques sonnes of that Countrey and part of Dominica , but they shortly after ran away from them a
Canaries (Saint Lucia) (search for this): narrative 668
of fiftie tunnes, and the Dorothie, a small barke: whereunto were also adjoyned for speedy services, two small pinnesses. The principall Gentlemen of our companie, were these, M. Ralph Lane, M. Tomas Candish, M. John Arundell, M. Raymund, M. Stukeley, M. Bremige, M. Vincent, and M. John Clarke, and divers others, whereof some were Captaines, and other some Assistants for counsell, and good directions in the voyage. The 14. day of Aprill wee fell with Lancerota and Forteventura, Isles of the Canaries, and from thence we continued our course for Dominica , one of the Antiles of the West India, wherewith we fell the 7. day of May, and the 10. day following wee came to an anker at Cotesa, a little Iland situate neere to the Iland of S. John, where we landed, and refreshed our selves all that day. The 12. day of May wee came to an anker in the Bay of Moskito, in the Iland of S. John, within a Faulcon shot of the shoare: where our Generall Sir Richard Greenevil, and the most part o
Fayal (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 668
The 22. of September we went aboard the Raynebow, and towards night we spake with the Swift-sure, and gave him 3. pieces. The captaines desired our company; wherefore we willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come togethwhich was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the Ea
Italy (Italy) (search for this): narrative 668
r the cope of heaven, so abounding with sweete trees, that bring such sundry rich and pleasant gummes, grapes of such greatnesse, yet wilde, as France, Spaine nor Italie have no greater, so many sorts of Apothecarie drugs, such severall kindes of flaxe, & one kind like silke, the same gathered of a grasse, as common there, as grasre my selfe being inhabited with English, no realme in Christendome were comparable to it. For this already we finde, that what commodities soever Spaine, France, Italy , or the East partes doe yeeld unto us, in wines of all sortes, in oyles, in flaxe, in rosens, pitch, frankensence, corrans, sugers, and such like, these parts doe the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent t
Azores (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 668
e so forcibly, that wee were able to beare no sayle, but our fore-course halfe mast high, wherewith wee ranne upon the winde perforce, the due course for England , for that wee were driven to change our first determination for Trynidad, and stoode for the Ilands of Acores, where wee purposed to take in fresh water, and also there hoped to meete with some English men of warre about those Ilands, at whose hands wee might obtaine some supply of our wants. And thus continuing our course for the Acores , sometimes with calmes, and sometimes with very scarce windes, on the fifteenth of September the winde came South Southeast, and blew so exceedingly, that wee were forced to lye atry all that day. At this time by account we judged our selves to be about twentie leagues to the West of Cuervo and Flores , but about night the storme ceased, and fayre weather ensued. On Thursday the seventeenth wee saw Cuervo and Flores , but we could not come to anker that night, by reason the winde shifted
Mogador (Morocco) (search for this): narrative 668
White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590.THE 20 of March the three shippes the Hopewell , the John Evangelist, and the Little John, put to Sea from Plymmouth with two small Shallops. The 25 at midnight both our Shallops were sunke being towed at the ships stearnes by the Boatswaines negligence. On the 30 we saw a head us that part of the coast of Barbary, lying East of Cape Cantyn, and the Bay of Asaphi. The next day we came to the Ile of Mogador, where rode, at our passing by, a Pinnesse of London called the Mooneshine. Aprill.ON the first of Aprill we ankored in Santa Cruz rode, where we found two great shippes of London lading in Sugar, of whom we had 2 shipboats to supply the losse of our Shallops. On the 2 we set sayle from the rode of Santa Cruz, for the Canaries. On Saturday the 4 we saw Alegranza, the East Ile of the Canaries. On Sunday the 5 of Aprill we gave chase to
Portugal (Portugal) (search for this): narrative 668
willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come together. The Admirall put forth a flag of counsel, in which was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the East, the winde at Northeast by East. On Sunday the 27. towards Evening wee tooke our leave of the Admirall and the whol
Pinos (Zacatecas, Mexico) (search for this): narrative 668
ete, against whom the next morning we fought and tooke him, with losse of one of our men and two hurt, and of theirs 4 slaine and 6 hurt. But what was become of our Viceadmirall, our Pinnesse, and Prize, and two Frigates, in all this time, we were ignorant. The 3 of July we spent about rifling, romaging and fitting the Prize to be sailed with us. The 6 of July we saw Jamayca the which we left on our larboord, keeping Cuba in sight on our starboord. Upon the 8 of July we saw the Iland of Pinos, which lieth on the Southside of Cuba nigh unto the West end or Cape called Cape S. Anthony. And the same day we gave chase to a Frigat, but at night we lost sight of her, partly by the slow sayling of our Admirall, & lacke of the Moonelight our Pinnesse, whom Captaine Cooke had sent to the Cape the day before. On the 11 we came to Cape S. Anthony, where we found our consort the Moonelight and her Pinnesse abiding for our comming, of whom we understood that the day before there passe
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