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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. Search the whole document.

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Secotan (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): narrative 668
aforesaid were seene onely of the inhabitantes of Secotan , which appeared to be very true, for they wondred te. Adjoyning to this countrey aforesaid called Secotan beginneth a countrey called Pomovik, belonging to t discovered the townes of Pomejok, Aquascogoc and Secotan , and also the great lake called by the Savages Paqsed by water to Aquascogok. The 15. we came to Secotan , and were well entertained there of the Savages. fled. The 18. we returned from the discovery of Secotan , and the same day came aboord our Fleete ryding atermost place to the Southward of any discovery was Secotan , being by estimation fourescore miles distant fromerence further with them, concerning the people of Secotan , Aquascogoc, & Pomeiok, willing them of Croatoan tinvile, were suddenly set upon, by 30 of the men of Secota , Aquascogoc, and Dasamonguepeuk, in manner followinhe comming of the Wiroanses of Pomeiok, Aquascogoc, Secota , and Dasamonguepeuk, seeing that the seven dayes we
Japan (Japan) (search for this): narrative 668
ike in discovering the maine of the West Indies. The maine also of this Countrey of Virginia, extending some wayes so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise then by the relation of the inhabitants wee have most certaine knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince hath any possession or dealing, cannot but yeelde many kinds of excellent commodities, which we in our discovery have not yet seene. What hope there is els to bee gathered of the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent temperature of the aire there at all seasons, much warmer then in England , and never so vehemently hot, as sometimes is under and betweene the Tropikes, or neere them, cannot be knowen unto you without further relation. For
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): narrative 668
e men, and some other necessaries had come to us in any convenient sufficiencie. For this river of Moratico promiseth great things, and by the opinion of M. Hariots the head of it by the description of the Countrey, either riseth from the bay of Mexico , or els from very neere unto the same, that openeth out into the South sea. And touching the Minerall, thus doeth M. Youghan affirme, that though it be but copper, seeing the Savages are able to melt it, it is one of the richest Minerals in d tooke out of some others so much as the time would permit. And further wee understood of them, that in their returne from Jamaica about the Organes neere Cape Saint Anthony, our Viceadmirall mette with two Shippes of the mayne land, come from Mexico , bound for Havana , with whom he fought: in which fight our Viceadmirals Lieutenant was slaine, and the Captaines right arme strooken off, with foure other of his men slaine, and sixteene hurt. But in the ende he entred, and tooke one of the Spa
Greece (Greece) (search for this): narrative 668
ding some wayes so many hundreds of leagues, as otherwise then by the relation of the inhabitants wee have most certaine knowledge of, where yet no Christian prince hath any possession or dealing, cannot but yeelde many kinds of excellent commodities, which we in our discovery have not yet seene. What hope there is els to bee gathered of the nature of the Climate, being answerable to the Iland of Japan, the land of China , Persia , Jury, the Ilands of Cyprus and Candy, the South parts of Greece , Italy and Spaine, and of many other notable and famous Countreys, because I meane not to be tedious, I leave to your owne consideration. Whereby also the excellent temperature of the aire there at all seasons, much warmer then in England , and never so vehemently hot, as sometimes is under and betweene the Tropikes, or neere them, cannot be knowen unto you without further relation. For the holsomnesse thereof I neede to say but thus much: that for all the want of provision, as first
Ancre (France) (search for this): narrative 668
eing pearced with nine shotte under water, got away; whom our Viceadmirall intended to pursue: but some of their men in the toppe made certaine rockes, which they saw above water neere the shoare, to be Gallies of Havana and Cartagena , comming from Havana to rescue the two Ships; Wherefore they gave over their chase, and went for England . After this intelligence was given us by this our prize, he departed from us, and went for England . On Saturday the 19. of September we came to an Ancre neere a small village on the North side of Flores , where we found ryding 5. English men of warre, of whom wee understood that our Viceadmirall and Prize were gone thence for England . One of these five was the Moonelight our consort, who upon the first sight of our comming into Flores , set sayle and went for England , not taking any leave of us. On Sunday the 20. the Mary Rose, Admirall of the Queenes fleete, wherein was Generall Sir John Hawkins, stood in with Flores , and divers other
August, 1587 AD (search for this): narrative 668
nes in that behalfe for us all, and he not once, but often refusing it, for our sakes, and for the honour & maintenance of the action, hath at last, though much against his will, through our importunacie, yeelded to leave his governement, and all his goods among us, and himselfe in all our behalfes to passe into England , of whose knowledge and fidelitie in handling this matter, as all others, we doe assure ourselves by these presents, and will you to give all credite thereunto, the 25 of August 1587. The Governour being at the last through their extreame intreating constrayned to returne into England , having then but halfe a dayes respite to prepare himselfe for the same, departed from Roanoak the seven and twentieth of August in the morning, and the same day about midnight, came aboord the Flieboat, who already had weyed anker, and rode without the barre, the Admirall riding by them, who but the same morning was newly come thither againe. The same day both the ships weyed anker
April, 1586 AD (search for this): narrative 668
fficient to have performed the greatest part of the premisses, must ever make me to thinke the hand of God onely (for some his good purpose to my selfe yet unknowen) to have bene in the matter. The second part touching the conspiracie of Pemisapan, the discovery of the same, and at the last, of our request to depart with Sir Francis Drake for England . ENSENORE a Savage father to Pemisapan being the onely friend to our nation that we had amongst them, and about the King, died the 20. of April 1586. He alone had before opposed himselfe in their consultations against all matters proposed against us, which both the King and all the rest of them after Grangemoes death, were very willing to have preferred. And he was not onely by the meere providence of God during his life, a meane to save us from hurt, as poysonings and such like, but also to doe us very great good, and singularly in this. The King was advised and of himselfe disposed, as a ready meane to have assuredly brought us to
ugh in a homely stile, especially for the contentation of a delicate eare) the true discourse of my last voyage into the West Indies, and partes of America called Virginia , taken in hand about the end of Februarie, in the yeare of our redemption 1590. And what events happened unto us in this our journey, you shall plainely perceive by the sequele of my discourse. There were at the time aforesaid three ships absolutely determined to goe for the West Indies, at the speciall charges of M. John Wa& their good desire, I take my leave: from my house at Newtowne in Kylmore the 4 of February, 1593.Your most welwishing friend, JOHN WHITE. The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590.THE 20 of March the three shippes the Hopewell , the John Evangelist, and the Little John, put to Sea from Plymmouth with two small Shallops. The 25 at midnight both our Shallops were sunke being towed at the ships stearnes by the Boatswaines
March, 1586 AD (search for this): narrative 668
posed himselfe in their consultations against all matters proposed against us, which both the King and all the rest of them after Grangemoes death, were very willing to have preferred. And he was not onely by the meere providence of God during his life, a meane to save us from hurt, as poysonings and such like, but also to doe us very great good, and singularly in this. The King was advised and of himselfe disposed, as a ready meane to have assuredly brought us to ruine in the moneth of March 1586. himselfe also with all his Savages to have runne away from us, and to have left his ground in the Iland unsowed: which if hee had done, there had bene no possibilitie in common reason, (but by the immediate hande of God) that wee coulde have bene preserved from starving out of hande. For at that time wee had no weares for fish, neither coulde our men skill of the making of them, neither had wee one graine of Corne for seede to put into the ground. In mine absence on my voyage that I ha
August, 1585 AD (search for this): narrative 668
M. Hakluyt and M. H. I have joyned you both in one letter of remembrance, as two that I love dearely well, and commending me most heartily to you both, I commit you to the tuition of the Almightie. From the new Fort in Virginia , this third of September, 1585.Your most assured friend RALPH LANE. An account of the particularities of the imployments of the English men left in Virginia by Sir Richard Greenevill under the charge of Master Ralph Lane Generall of the same, from the 17. of August 1585. until the 18. of June 1586. at which time they departed the Countrey: sent and directed to Sir Walter Ralegh.THAT I may proceede with order in this discourse, I thinke it requisite to divide in into two parts. The first shall declare the particularities of such parts of the Countrey within the maine, as our weake number, and supply of things necessarie did inable us to enter into the discovery of. The second part shall set downe the reasons generally moving us to resolve on our depar
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